Blackwell, Alice Stone

Daughter of Lucy Stone, women’s and human rights advocate, edited “Woman’s Journal” 1893-1918

Price: $125.00

Description:
(1857-1950) Feminist, journalist and human rights advocate. Only child of Henry B. Blackwell and Lucy Stone, her mother was first woman to earn a college degree in Massachusetts, first woman to keep her maiden name when she married and first woman to speak full-time on woman’s rights. Her aunt, Elizabeth Blackwell, was the first woman to graduate from medical school in the US. BA Boston University 1881 (Phi Beta Kappa), worked as an assistant editor for her parents who founded the “Woman’s Journal”, official magazine for the American Woman Suffrage Association (AWSA). In 1890, Alice led movement to reconcile AWSA and National Woman Suffrage Association into the National American Woman Suffrage Association. She was NAWSA’s recording secretary until 1918. In the fall of 1893, Lucy Stone died and Alice took the position as editor-in-chief of the “Woman’s Journal”. Became engaged in “the Armenian Question” and co-created (with Ohannes Chatschumian) “Friends of Armenia” to provide information about Armenians and “the Armenian Question “to US media - Julia Ward Howe was Society president. With Ohannes she translated Armenian poetry and in May 1896 published “Armenian Poems”. She also translated other volumes of poetry into English from Russian (“Songs of Russia”, 1906), Yiddish (“Songs of Grief and Gladness”, 1907), Spanish (“Some Spanish-American Poets”, 1929), Hungarian & French. In 1917 she edited “The Little Grandmother of the Russian Revolution” about Catherine Breshkovsky. She remained editor-in-chief of the “Woman’s Journal” for 35 years,until 1918,then began writing her mother’s biography, “Lucy Stone: Pioneer of Woman’s Rights”, published 1930. 11 x 8 ½ ALS to Mrs. (Charlotte Barrel) Ware, Cambridge, Mass., March 31 1939, of whom Blackwell has thought many times “with sorrow for what you and your husband have had to endure”, notes their mutual admiration and esteem. Pencil note at top left (upside down) corner says: “This was re: 1938 Hurricane at Warelands, Norfolk, Mass, trees etc. destroyed. B. Mellett”. The Great Hurricane of 1938 was the first major hurricane to strike New England since 1869. To date it remains the most powerful, costliest and deadliest hurricane in New England history. oorm 1905-1913, society woman Charlotte Barrel Ware shocked many of her contemporary proper Bostonians by operating a unique and internationally famous commercial enterprise, The Warelands Dairy and breeding farm, the finest dairy barn and dairy bottling house of its day. It produced the highest quality certified milk in the entire US. In 1909 Charlotte expanded her operations and opened the Warelands Dairy School with 40 of the top professors in public health in the country on her staff. At a time when hundreds of thousands of children & adults died annually of diarrheal and tubercular milk disease, her scientific, educational and social-humanitarian impact was immeasurable. She was recognized internationally, for dramatically influencing agricultural dairy practices, the milk industry, commercial transport and sale of milk, worldwide.

Condition: Very good, mail folds
Type:Letter






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