Welch Jr., Robert H. W.

Ultra-conservative ideologue, founded John Birch Society 1958 to promote theory that Communists controlled US society

Price: $50.00

Description:
(1899-1985) American businessman, political activist, author, used wealth to sponsor anti-Communist causes. Co-founded ultra-conservative John Birch Society 1958. Founded Oxford Candy Company in Brooklyn, his Papa Sucker, flat piece or caramel with a stick in it, eaten like a lollipop, licensed to Brach's of Chicago. Oxford went out of business during the Depression, and he was hired by his brother's firm, the James O. Welch Company. They began making caramel lollipops, Sugar Daddies, and he developed other candies such as Sugar Babies, Junior Mints, and Pom Poms. Retired a wealthy man in 1956. Welch had been an opponent of Communism from his teenage years and strongly believed in various conspiracies in which a wide range of individuals and organizations were part of an international Communist plot. He founded the John Birch Society (JBS) Dec. 1958 with original membership of 11 men but Welch's wealth allowed the organization to have a wide impact and sponsor a number of publications. At its height, JBS claimed 100,000 members, but its views limited its ability to form alliances with other groups (even other anti-Communists like Richard Nixon and, to a lesser extent, Ronald Reagan, were denounced by JBS as being too liberal) and diminished its real impact. GOP mainstream unhappiness with the Society intensified after Welch circulated a letter calling President Eisenhower a possible "conscious, dedicated agent of the Communist Conspiracy." The charge led many conservatives and Republicans to shy away from the group. In Oct. 1965, William F. Buckley, Jr. attacked Welch to prevent his outlandish views from tarnishing the entire conservative movement. Welch accused Presidents Truman & Eisenhower of being communist sympathizers and possibly Soviet agents of influence. Welch went further in a 1956 book “The Politician”, pub. by the JBS 1963, saying that President Roosevelt knew about the Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor in advance, but said nothing because he wanted to get his country in the war. In the 60s, he began to believe Communism was just a front for a Master Conspiracy, with roots in the Illuminati. He referred to the conspirators as "The Insiders," internationalist financial and business families like the Rothschilds & Rockefellers, and organizations such as the Bilderbergers, the Council on Foreign Relations, and the Trilateral Commission. He was editor and publisher of the monthly magazine “American Opinion” and weekly "The Review of the News". He also wrote “The Road to Salesmanship” 1941, “May God Forgive Us “ 1951, and “The Life of John Birch” 1954. A collection of his essays were published in book "The New Americanism". 9 x 6 program for July 4, 1964 Boston Statler-Hilton Hotel testimonial dinner honoring Welch on the 5th anniversary of the founding of the John Birch Society, signed and inscribed with sentiment to Rev. Cornelius Greenway on the front color cover portrait (behind lettered clear overlay cover). The John Birch Society was named after a Baptist minister and Army Intelligence officer killed by Chinese Communists in 1945. Cornelius Greenway (1896-1968) immigrated to US from Holland 1914. Served in France in WW I, received Purple Heart and Service Medal. Tufts Univ. BA 1925, STB 1928. Began collecting autographs, inc. photos, in late 20’s. Universalist minister 1926, served parishes in Taunton & Boston, Mass. Pastor of All Souls Church, Brooklyn, NY 1929-65, affiliated with Natl. Assn. of Congregational Christian Churches 1961.

Condition: Very good
Type:Signed Program






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