Grosvenor, Gilbert H.

“Father of Photojournalism”, edited National Geographic Magazine 1899-1954, Society President 1920-54

Price: $75.00

Description:
(1875-1966) Father of photojournalism, 1st full-time editor of National Geographic Magazine 1899-1954. Built magazine into the iconic publication of today and, as president of the National Geographic Society 1920-54, created one of the world's largest and best known science and learning organizations, aided by bold chronicling in its magazine of ambitious natural and cultural global explorations. Noted geographer and world traveler, his 1st rip to the western US was on (1st) National Park Service Director Stephen Mather's 1915 "Big Trip" to Sequoia National Park and the High Sierras, where he was so overwhelmed by his experience that he became a long-time friend of Mather and the National Parks. He provided $20,000 of National Geographic Society funds to supplement a $50,000 congressional appropriation to buy Giant Forest and add it to Sequoia National Park. In late 1915-1916, Grosvenor met with Mather, Horace Albright (Mather’s aide & NPS successor), and others to develop the substance of the National Park Service Organic Act. He dedicated the April 1916 issue of National Geographic to the National Parks to further promote values of park resources to the American public and Albright saw that every member of Congress received a copy of the magazine as the Organic Act legislation was being considered. The Society's interest in protecting the Katmai volcanic crater and Valley of Ten Thousand Smokes from mining exploitation led to the 1918 establishment of Katmai National Monument. Grosvenor was Alexander Graham Bell’s son-in-law and cousin of William H. Taft. Grosvenor Arch, sandstone double arch located in southern Utah, named for him. TLS as Editor, January 25 1934, on blue "National Geographic Society/Washington, D.C." letterhead, NRA “Blue Eagle” at top left, listing him as Society President. He writes author Eustace L. Adams of Clearwater, Fla. regretting the Magazine cannot presently use Adams’ article on the Tarpon Springs sponge fishing colony. Eustace Lane Adams (1891-1963) From mid-late 20's wrote articles and short stories for magazines such as The American Magazine and Argosy. His novels were published by Brewer Warren, Grosset and Dunlap, Coward McCann and The Dial Press. Four movies were made from his works: short story “Sixteen Fathoms Deep” was filmed twice, 1934 & 1948, both with Lon Chaney Jr. in a role; his story "Loot Below” was made into 1941 film “Desperate Cargo”. Wrote screenplay for film “Under Secret Orders” dir. by Sam Newfield and continued writing into the 50's.

Condition: Very good
Type:Letter






[View Shopping Cart]
[Home] [Articles] [Biography] [Calendar]
[Catalogue] [Search]



enbainc@cs.com

Edward N. Bomsey Autographs, Inc.
7317 Farr Street
Annandale, VA 22003-2516
(703) 642-2040(phone & fax)




Home
Home

Articles
Articles

Biography
Biography

Calendar
Calendar

Catalogue
Catalogue

Search
Search