Lerner, Alan Jay (ON HOLD)

Award-winning librettist-lyricist of musicals, inc. “Brigadoon”, “Gigi”, “My Fair Lady”, "Camelot”

Price: $75.00

Description:
(1918-1986) American lyricist & librettist, with Frederick Loewe created some of the world's most popular and enduring works of musical theatre for stage and screen. He won 3 Tony and 3 Academy Awards, among other honors. Educated at Choate School in Wallingford, Ct. (he wrote "The Choate Marching Song") and Harvard, at both, a classmate of John F. Kennedy. His musical theater career began with contributions to the annual Harvard Hasty Pudding musicals. At Harvard, he lost his sight in his left eye due to a boxing accident, so he could not serve in WW II. He wrote radio scripts, incl. “Your Hit Parade”, until introduced to Austrian composer Frederick Loewe, who needed a partner, in 1942 at the Lamb's Club where he met Lorenz Hart, who helped transform Lerner into his protege. Lerner & Loewe's 1st collaboration was musical “Life of the Party” for a Detroit stock company. Their 1st hit was “Brigadoon” (1947), followed in 1951 by the less successful “Paint Your Wagon”. Lerner worked with Kurt Weill on the stage musical “Love Life” (1948) and with Burton Lane on the movie musical “Royal Wedding” (1951). In 1951 he also wrote the Oscar-winning original screenplay for “An American in Paris”, produced by Arthur Freed and directed by Vincente Minnelli; the same team joined Lerner & Loewe to create “Gigi”. In 1956, Lerner & Loewe unveiled “My Fair Lady”. Their adaptation of Shaw's “Pygmalion” set box-office records in New York & London. When brought to the screen in 1964, the film version won 8 Oscars. Their success continued with their next project, the Academy Award winning musical “Gigi”. The Lerner-Loewe partnership cracked under the stress of producing ”Camelot” in 1960, Loewe resisting Lerner's desire to direct as well as write when director Moss Hart suffered a heart attack. Lerner was hospitalized with bleeding ulcers and Loewe continued to have heart troubles. “Camelot” was a hit, to this day invoked to describe the idealism, romance, and tragedy of the Kennedy years. Loewe retired and Lerner worked on several unsuccessful musicals with composers André Previn, John Barry, Leonard Bernstein, Burton Lane, and Charles Strouse. In 1965 he collaborated with Lane on “On a Clear Day You Can See Forever”, adapted for film in 1970. Lerner was inducted into the Songwriters Hall of Fame 1971. At the time of his death, he had begun to write lyrics for “The Phantom of the Opera”, and wrote “Masquerade”. He declined to write English-language lyrics for the musical “Les Misérables”. Received 1985 Kennedy Center Honors. SP, 10 x 8 b&w bust portrait in turtleneck and jacket, signed at top left.

Condition: Very good
Type:Photograph






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