Obregon Salido, Alvaro

Signed photograph of Mexico's 1920-24 President, assassinated 1928

Price: $135.00

Description:
(1880-1928) President of Mexico 1920-24, assassinated 1928 shortly after winning election to another term. Successful Sonora farmer and municipal president of Huatabampo, Obregón first volunteered for military service in 1912 supporting the regime of Francisco Madero against a rebellion in Chihuahua led by Pascual Orozco. This was his first display of his considerable military skills. Following Feb. 9-19, 1913 events in Mexico City during the Mexican Revolution, culminating in a coup and the assassination of President Madero and Vice President Suárez, Obregón offered his military services to the Sonoran government opposing the regime of Victoriano Huerta and supported Sonora's decision to follow Venustiano Carranza. Carranza appointed Obregón commander-in-chief of the revolutionary forces in NW Mexico. His troops advanced south through western Mexico. Following tensions with Pancho Villa, Carranza ordered Obregón to ensure that Obregón's forces entered Mexico City before Villa. Obregón spent 1915 leading Carrancista forces against Villa & Zapata, both former allies of Carranza. In April 1915, at the Battle of Celaya, he lost his right arm. Following pacification of the Villistas & Zapatistas, Carranza appointed Obregón Minister of War in 1915. In 1917 Obregón resigned to distance himself from Carranza and position himself for a 1920 presidential run. When Carranza tried to arrest Obregón to ensure that Carranza's preferred candidate won the 1920 election, Obregón launched a revolt against Carranza, in which Carranza was killed. When elections were held, Obregón won with overwhelming support. His presidency was the first stable presidency since the launching of the Mexican Revolution. He oversaw massive educational reform (with Mexican muralism flourishing), moderate land reform, and labor laws sponsored by the increasingly powerful Regional Confederation of Mexican Workers, and secured US recognition of his regime. In 1923-24, Finance Minister Adolfo de la Huerta led a rebellion against him in Veracruz and Jalisco, forcing Obregón to return to the battlefield to crush the rebellion. In 1924, his handpicked successor, Plutarco Elías Calles, was elected president. Though Obregón ostensibly retired to Sonora, he remained influential. In 1926, the Mexican Congress eliminated the one-term limit for the presidency, allowing him to run for re-election in 1928. Obregón won, but before he could begin his term, he was assassinated by José de León Toral, a Catholic supporter of the counter-revolution against the government set off by religious persecution of Christians, especially Catholics, and specifically the strict enforcement of the anti-clerical provisions of the Mexican Constitution of 1917 and the expansion of further anti-clerical laws. SP, 11 x 8 ½ (approx.) b&w bust portrait in left profile by I. Rodriguez Avalos studio of Puebla, Mexico, signed “A. Obregon” on image to left of photography studio name. Mounted in 14 ½ x 9 ¾ grey presentation folder.

Condition: Very good, some slight silvering at lower right, few slight creases; folder shows slight wear
Type:Photograph






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