Crumb, R(obert).

1978 good content ALS from the best known counter-culture comics artist

Price: $295.00

Description:
(b. 1943) American artist and illustrator, a founder of the underground comics movement. Crumb grew up around military bases in Philadelphia and California, and Milford, Delaware, in a dysfunctional family. He grew increasingly depressed and was contemplating suicide at 19 before he moved to Cleveland to design greeting cards for the American Greetings Corporation. He continued his comic work and submitted one to Mad magazine creator Harvey Kurtzman's Help! magazine. Encouraged by his boyhood idol Kurtzman, he moved to New York in 1964 to work as Kurtzman's assistant, but Help! folded. He spent a year making comics trading cards for Topps, then returned to Cleveland. He moved to San Francisco in 1967 and did some comics for Yarrowstalks magazine before publishing the 1st issue of his Zap Comix in 1968 and establishing himself as the best-known artist of the countercultural comics movement. Crumb's coupling of early 20th century cartoon styles with his satirical stories and defiant disregard of the Comics Code and traditional American "decency", earned him unexpected success outside the mainstream of comic book publishing. His most widely recognized works are the “Keep on Truckin'” drawings, and characters asuch s Mr. Natural, Fritz the Cat, Angelfood McSpade, and Devil Girl, among others. He founded and contributed to the comics anthology Weirdo which ran through the 1980s. In 1972, Ralph Bakshi wrote and directed “Fritz the Cat”, which grossed $90Mand was the first "X" rated animated film; Crumb disliked it and killed Fritz in his comics. His comics have been praised as the work of satirical genius and condemned as socially degrading, racist, misogynist, and immature pornography. Loathing celebrity status, he moved to France. ALS “R. Crumb” on verso of a 3 ¼ x 5 ½ 9c US postcard, postmarked Madison, California, May 4 1978, addressed on recto by him to a San Francisco fellow artist, admirer and aspiring animator. In part, Crumb states: “Can't sell anymore of my artwork as I may have to put it up for collateral on a loan from the bank to help pay off the I.R.S. debt…I'm glad to see that someone is still trying to do good animation which has nothing to do with Chevron or Levis…I'll never go near animation again…unless I decide to do it myself, which is highly unlikely.” Crumb had a very negative experience with the animation of his Fritz the Cat features. This is an important comment on his view of animation, as he refused to consider it (and most commercial exploitation of his characters) even as a source of needed income.

Condition: Very good, few small spots.
Type:Letter






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