Tuck, Amos (ON HOLD)

A New Hampshire founder of the Republican Party, friend of Lincoln

Price: $88.00

Description:
(1810–1879) New Hampshire politician, a founder of the Republican Party. Graduated from Dartmouth College 1835 (later a Dartmouth Trustee), Hampton Academy (founded by his ancestors) Headmaster 1836-38, studied law, entered the bar 1838. Elected to the State House of Representatives 1842 as a Democratic. The New Hampshire Democratic Party was in the grip of pro-slavery men like Franklin Pierce. Tuck broke with the Democrats in 1844 and held a meeting in Feb. 1845 in Exeter to oppose the party platform. This convention would later be seen as "the nucleus of the Republican Party." Calling themselves "Independent Democrats," they wrote resolutions opposing expansion of slavery into the territories and annexation of Texas in particular. John P. Hale was nominated as candidate for the Senate and won election, becoming the sole anti-slavery voice in the US Senate for the next 2 years. Tuck ran as a Free-Soil candidate to the 31st Congress, and as a Whig to the 32nd Congress (March 4, 1847-March 3, 1853). In the 31st Congress he was seated near the back next to another junior congressman, Abraham Lincoln. Lincoln's views on slavery were evolving when they served together, but over the course of the next few years he drifted away from the Whig platform and Tuck became more anti-slavery in his beliefs. Tuck and Lincoln were of different political parties and often voted on opposite sides of issues, but the two formed a friendship and 12 years later, Tuck's new Republican Party would catapult Lincoln onto the national stage. Tuck returned to Exeter in 1853 and began a movement to unite the many political factions in New Hampshire. Tuck organized a secret meeting of a group of anti-slavery men on Oct. 12, 1853 at Major Blake's Hotel in Exeter. Tuck suggested they form a party to be called "Republicans”, a term widely used in New Hampshire politics in the 1830s. All rejected his suggestion and none, inc. Tuck, became Republicans until 2 or more years later. In March 1854, Tuck held a meeting in Exeter at the Squamscott House that would create the Republican Party that Lincoln would later embrace. The participants campaigned for several parties in 1854 state elections, but the Republican Party did not run a ticket that year in the state. Tuck himself campaigned for the Free Soil party in 1854. He helped form the state Republican Party in 1856 and was a delegate to the 1856 & 1860 Republican Conventions. His friendship with Lincoln continued even after both left Congress. At Tuck's suggestion, Robert Lincoln, having failed his Harvard entrance exams, enrolled at Phillips Exeter Academy in 1859 for a year of hard cramming. Tuck was appointed a delegate to the 1861 Washington Peace Convention and was Naval Officer of the port of Boston 1861-1865. Following the Civil War, resumed practice of law and engaged in railroad building, gaining great success and wealth. His son, Edward Tuck, financed and founded the Amos Tuck School of Business Administration at Dartmouth, as well as the Tuck Historical Building in Concord, home of the New Hampshire Historical Society and its Tuck Library. Family and political descendants founded the Amos Tuck Society to promote and spread the history of Tuck’s contributions and founding of the Republican Party. 8 ¼ x 5 ¼ ALS to Dr. Otis, np, "Sunday morning", July 28 1878, invitation to Dr. Otis, his sister and brother to join Tuck for a “family dinner”. With 28pp bound 9 1/4 x 6 3/4 pamphlet "A Memorial Discourse Delivered at the Second Congregational Church, Exeter, N. H. by Rev. George E. Street, 11 January, 1880", published in Boston, his eulogy to Tuck. Penciled “Regards of G.E.S.” (likely Rev. Street) at lower corner of front cover.

Condition: Very good, covers of pamphlet loose and slightly soiled.
Type:Letter






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