Hoffman, John T.

New York City Mayor 1866-68, NY Governor 1869-72, ties to Boss Tweed ruined further ambitions

Price: $25.00

Description:
(1828-1888) New York City Recorder 1861-65, Mayor of New York City 1866-68, 23rd Governor of New York 1869–72. Connections to the Tweed Ring ruined his political career, in spite of absence of evidence to show his involvement in corrupt activities. Union College 1846, admnitted to the Bar 1849, practiced law in New York City. When he was elected mayor in 1865, reformers had high hopes for him. He was elected governor in 1868, his election aided by Boss Tweed and Tammany Hall. That Hoffman was aided by Tweed, and his voter majority was so large for that time, would be taken as proof that he was a member of the Tweed Ring. While Tweed frequently saw Hoffman in Albany on various votes and projects, it was no more than any other major Democrat in New York State. They worked harmoniously together, and Tweed aided Hoffman’s 1870 re-election. Shortly afterwards a new City Charter was enacted which gave more local autonomy to New York City. Such reform had been discussed for decades, but Tweed and Hoffman brought it to fruition. At this point Tweed's corruption was revealed in The New York Times and Harper's Weekly, and the new Charter was discredited as being planned for more municipal corruption. At this time Hoffman was also considering a run for the presidency in 1872, and Tweed was to be his manager. The Tweed scandals wrecked his chances and the nomination was eventually split between Democrats supporting Horace Greeley and those supporting New York attorney Charles O'Conor. LS on 10 x 7 ¾ engraved lined letterhead as New York City Mayor, June 6 1868, early City engraved seal top left, to Elliott C. Cowdin, Chairman, Committee on Arrangements, accepting an invitation to attend “…a public dinner to be given by the citizens of New York to the Chinese Embassy…” Elliott C. Cowdin (1819-1880) was born in Vermont, entered business in Boston, where he mastered the intricacies of silks and their manufacture. He established his own firm in New York with a branch in Paris, and lived alternately in both cities as circumstances dictated or suggested. In Paris he was the leading member of the American colony, friend and confidant to a succession of US Ministers. He was the maternal grandfather of Taft Secretary of State Robert Bacon (1860-1919).

Condition: Very good
Type:Letter






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