Beery, Wallace

Frameable vintage pencil signature of the Oscar-winning actor

Price: $65.00

Description:
(1885-1949) American actor, appeared in some 250 movies over a 36-year span. A younger brother of actor/film executive William Beery and actor Noah Beery, he ran away from home and joined the Ringling Brothers Circus at 16, left 2 years later and worked in NYC in comic opera and began to appear on Broadway. In 1913, he moved to Chicago to work for Essanay Studios, and later worked for Essanay in Niles, California. He began playing villains, and in 1917 portrayed Pancho Villa in “Patria” when Villa was still active in Mexico. Notable silent films inc.: Arthur Conan Doyle's dinosaur epic “The Lost World” (1925); “Robin Hood” (1922,with Douglas Fairbanks), “Last of the Mohicans” (1920), “Casey at the Bat” (1927), and “Beggars of Life” (1928, with Louise Brooks). His powerful basso voice and gruff drawl became assets when Irving Thalberg hired him under contract to MGM as a character actor at the dawn of the sound film era. Beery played the savage convict "Butch," in the successful 1930 prison film “The Big House”, for which he was nominated for an Oscar for Best Actor. In 1930 he made “Min and Bill” (opposite Marie Dressler), that vaulted him into the box office first rank. He followed with “The Champ”, winning the 1931 Best Actor Oscar, and the role of Long John Silver in “Treasure Island” (1934). He received a gold medal from the Venice Film Festival for his s2nd performance as Pancho Villa in “Viva Villa!” (1934, with Fay Wray). Other Beery films include: “Billy the Kid” (1930, with Johnny Mack Brown); “The Secret Six” (1931, with Jean Harlow & Clark Gable); “Hell Divers” (1931, with Gable); “Grand Hotel” (1932, with Joan Crawford); “Tugboat Annie” (1933, with Dressler); “Dinner at Eight” (1933, with Harlow); “The Bowery” (1933, with George Raft, Fay Wray, & Pert Kelton); “China Seas” (1935, with Gable & Harlow); and Eugene O'Neill's “Ah, Wilderness!” (1935). During the 30s he was one of Hollywood's Top 10 box office stars; at one point his MGM contract stipulated that he be paid $1 more than any other MGM contract player, making him the highest paid actor in the world. His career began to decline the 40s. In 1943 his brother Noah Beery, Sr. appeared with him in the war film “Salute to the Marines”, followed by “Bad Bascomb” (1946) and “The Mighty McGurk” (1947). He remained top-billed and none of Beery's films in the sound era lost money at the box office. Pencil signed 3 x 6 ľ slip, suitable for matting & framing

Condition: Very good
Type:Signature






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