Dallin, Cyrus E.

Signed postcard reproduction of sculpture “Appeal To The Great Spirit”, sculpted angel Moroni for LDS Temple in Salt Lake City, etc.

Price: $110.00 Special Offer - $75.00



Description:
(1861-1944) American sculptor and Olympic archer, created over 260 works, including well-known statues of Paul Revere and Native Americans. He also sculpted the statue of the angel Moroni atop the Salt Lake City Temple, a symbol for The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, and the pattern for further Angel Moroni statues on spires of subsequent LDS Temples. Born in Utah to a Mormon family, Dallin was not a Church member. At 19, he moved to Boston to study sculpture with Truman Howe Bartlett, then studied in Paris with Henri Chapu and at the Académie Julian. In 1883, he entered a competition for an equestrian statue of Paul Revere. He received a contract, but work was not accepted until 1899. He made 5 versions of Paul Revere; the statue was not unveiled until 1940. He initially turned down the offer to sculpt the Angel Moroni for the top of the LDS Salt Lake City Temple, and after finishing the statue said, "My angel Moroni brought me nearer to God than anything I ever did." In Boston, he became a colleague of Augustus St. Gaudens and a close friend of John Singer Sargent. In 1897, he returned to Paris and entered a “Don Quixote” in the Salon of 1897, and “Medicine Man” in the Salon of 1899 and 1900 Exposition Universelle. He moved to Arlington, Mass. in 1900, and was a member of the faculty of Massachusetts Normal Art School (since re-named Massachusetts College of Art and Design) 1899-1941. He is remembered in Arlington with an art museum and an elementary school named in his honor. More than 30 examples of his work are on display at the Springville Museum of Art in Springville, Utah. At the 1904 St. Louis Summer Olympics, Dallin winning a bronze medal in the team archery competition. His works include: “The Scout” (1910, Utah Museum of Fine Arts); “Signal of Peace” (1890, Lincoln Park, Chicago); Moroni, (1893, atop the Salt Lake City Temple); “The Medicine Man” (1899, Fairmount Park, Philadelphia); “Paul Revere” (1899 Boston); “The Pickett” (1905, Hanover, Penna.); “Appeal to the Great Spirit” (1909, Boston Museum of Fine Arts, also in Muncie, Indiana & Tulsa, Oklahoma; “Pioneer Women of Utah, (1931), Springville, Utah. “Appeal to the Great Spirit” is the last of a 4-piece series called “The Epic of the Indian”, incl. “The Signal of Peace” or “The Welcome” (1890); “Medicine Man” or “The Warning” (1899); “The Protest” or “The Defiance” (1904). In 1909, the sculpture was cast in Paris and won a gold medal in the Paris Salon. There are 3 full-size casts: the Muncie example is considered by many residents to be symbolic of their city; the most recent installation is in Tulsa's Woodward Park, dedicated in November 1985. 5 ½ x 3 ½ light sepia postcard image of Dallin’s noted sculpture “Appeal to the Great Spirit”, signed on the lower white border adding “Se.A.N.A.” With small magazine bust portrait of Dallin.

Condition: Very good, scant light toning at top & left edges
Type:Signed Postcard Reproduction






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