Lloyd, Henry Demarest

1900 TLS to editor Hamilton Holt on labor-management disputes and the International Permanent Court of Arbitration

Price: $15.00

Description:
(1847-1903) 19th century American progressive political activist and a forerunner to the later muckraking journalist, his exposés of the Standard Oil Company, written before Ida Tarbell's series for McClure's Magazine. In 1872, Lloyd joined the staff of the Chicago Tribune becoming financial editor in 1874 and chief editorial writer in 1875. He remained at the paper until 1885. During this period he was influenced by the ideas of Ralph Waldo Emerson and the British Christian Socialists. Lloyd wrote a searing exposé of the monopolistic abuses of John D. Rockefeller's Standard Oil Trust, The Story of a Great Monopoly, for the March 1881 issue of The Atlantic. He later fleshed out his case against the unbridled corporate power of Standard Oil and similar corporations in his best-known book, Wealth Against Commonwealth, published in 1894. Others articles exposing corruption in business and politics included The Political Economy of Seventy-Three Million Dollars (1882) in the Atlantic Monthly and Making Bread Dear (1883) & Lords of Industry (1884) in the North American Review. He continued to write for the Chicago Tribune until resigning in 1885 as a result of political differences with principal owner, Joseph Medill. After leaving the newspaper, he filed stories as a free-lance dispatcher, using the Associated Press wires, and his publications of outrage over the treatment of miners in the Spring Valley dispute are credited with ending that episode. He wrote and spoke on behalf of Milwaukee streetcar operators in 1893, and anthracite coal miners in 1902. Lloyd is credited with a leading role in pioneering what became known nationally as the "Winnetka system" of self-government, a reform cause broadly taken up by Samuel Gompers and the labor movement. In 1894, Lloyd ran for Congress as a Populist. He supported the aims of the Socialist Party and took part in the campaign to end child labor and to achieve clemency for the men accused of the Haymarket Bombing, a position that caused his father-in-law, William Bross, publisher of the Tribune, to disinherit him and his wife. He was also a strong supporter of women's suffrage and the trade union movement. A close friend of Jane Addams, Lloyd provided free lectures at the Hull House Settlement in Chicago. He became a leading figure in the reform movement and influenced a generation of political activists including John Peter Altgeld, Clarence Darrow, William Dean Howells and John Dewey. When Altgeld was elected governor of Illinois in 1892 he offered Lloyd the post as the state's first chief factory inspector; Lloyd declined the offer and suggested his friend Florence Kelley for the post. Lloyd wrote several books favoring progressive reform incl. A Strike of Millionaires Against Miners (1890), Labor Co-Partnerships (1898) and A Country Without Strikes (1900). His son, William Bross Lloyd, was a founder and early leader of the Communist Labor Party of America in 1919. After his death, Lloyd's library, with thousands of books and pamphlets relating to trade unionism, cooperation, socialism, and monopolies, was donated to the University of Wisconsin. The Center for Investigative Reporting launched the "Henry Demarest Lloyd Investigative Fund" in 2009 to provide grants to investigative journalists. Good content 10 ½ x 8 TLS, Boston, May 10 1900, to Mr. (Hamilton) Holt, written a month after the US became a signatory to the 1899 Hague Convention, suggesting he will write for Holt’s Independent. Lloyd expresses his understanding of decisions of the Arbitration Court, possible employer evasion of its decisions and consequences of so doing. Hamilton Holt (1872-1951) Educator, editor, author, politician. Editor and publisher of the liberal weekly magazine The Independent 1897-1921, outspoken advocate for reform, prohibition, immigrant rights, and international peace. In 1906 he published a collection of immigrants' life stories as The Life Stories of Undistinguished Americans as Told by Themselves. He was a founding member of the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People (NAACP) in 1909 and served on the Executive Committee of the League to Enforce Peace. In 1924 he unsuccessfully ran for the Senate from Connecticut. He was President of Rollins College 1925-49. The Permanent Court of Arbitration is an international organization based in The Hague in the Netherlands. Created in 1899 as one of the acts of the 1st Hague Peace Conference, it is the oldest institution for international dispute resolution. The US was a signatory to the 1899 Hague Convention on April 9, 1900.

Condition: Good, light toning, top right corner rounded, slight chip at lower right corner, folds
Type:Letter






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