Hibben, John Grier

Philosopher, Presbyterian minister, succeeded Woodrow Wilson as president of Princeton University

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(1861-1933) Presbyterian minister, philosopher, and educator, 14th president of Princeton University 1912–32, succeeding Woodrow Wilson. Entered the College of New Jersey (later renamed Princeton University) in 1878 and upon graduation in 1882, spent a year in philosophical studies at the University of Berlin. On his return he entered Princeton Theological Seminary and was ordained as a minister of the Presbyterian Church in the United States of America by the Carlisle Presbytery in 1887, having briefly served the Second Presbyterian Church at St. Louis. He spent 4 years at the Falling Spring Presbyterian Church at Chambersburg, Penna. He returned to Princeton as an instructor in logic in 1891, received an 1893 Ph.D., became asst. professor 1894, and Stuart Professor of Logic in 1907. In 1912 he succeeded Woodrow Wilson as president of Princeton. He agreed with Wilson's introduction of the preceptorial system in 1905 but did not support Wilson's proposal to eliminate upper class eating clubs and reforming dormitories by housing undergraduate students in quadrangles presided over by faculty members. He encouraged larger alumni and faculty participation in the governance of the university and was a resolute defender of academic freedom. The university endowment increased fivefold; faculty size doubled; a 4-course plan of study in the upper classes was initiated; work of the scientific departments was extended; and the schools of architecture, engineering, and public affairs were founded. Hibben's educational philosophy is expounded in A Defense of Prejudice (1911) and other philosophical writings include: Inductive Logic (1896); The Problems of Philosophy (1898); Hegel's Logic (1902); Deductive and Inductive Logic (1905). His most enduring contribution is The Philosophy of the Enlightenment (1910) in the Epochs of Philosophy Series, of which he was the general editor. He stirred large audiences with his appeals for national preparedness 1914-17, and during the war dedicated his own and the university's resources to national service. When peace came he joined the League of Nations non-partisan organization, worked for disarmament and conciliation, and was one of the first signers of a petition advocating the canceling of all war debts. He was awarded the French Légion d'honneur in 1919. His friendship with Col. Charles Lindbergh, with whom he was in daily contact after the tragic kidnapping at Hopewell, New Jersey, intensified his interest in the suppression of crime. Several thousand alumni established the Hibben Loan Fund for students in financial straits. A scholarship in Princeton bears his name, as does a street in Princeton and a mineral discovered by colleague Alexander H. Phillips. His monument on the campus is the chapel, the nave of which bears his name. SP, 5 x 3 ¾ b&w bust portrait mounted on 8 ½ x 5 ½ heavy card, signed with sentiment, adds Princeton University, January 23 1913 on card below photo.

Condition: Very good
Type:Photograph






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