Raymond, Henry J.

1861 autograph sentiment signed by the 1851 co-founder of The New York Times, a founder of the Republican Party, biographer of Lincoln

Price: $40.00

Description:
(1820-1869) American journalist, co-founded The New York Times (as the New-York Daily Times), publishing 1st issue Sept. 18, 1851. Between 1870 and 1871, the newspaper published a series of exposés that contributed to the downfall of Boss Tweed and his corrupt city government. Raymond worked for various newspapers 1841-51, inc. Greeley's New York Tribune and James Watson Webb's Courier and Enquirer, as a journalist and associate editor. He had known George Jones since their time at the Tribune. In 1851, Raymond convinced Jones to become his partner and publish a new paper that would report news in a neutral manner. In 1851, they formed Raymond, Jones & Company, Inc. and founded the New York Times, Raymond the editor until his death. He was a member of the New York State Assembly 1850 & 1851, Speaker in 1851. A member of the Whig party's Northern radical anti-slavery wing, he defeated Greeley for the Whig nomination for Lieutenant Governor of New York in 1854, served 1855-56. Raymond was a prominent founder of the Republican Party and drafted the Address to the People adopted by the Republican organizing convention that met in Pittsburgh Feb. 22, 1856. Again Speaker of the state Assembly 1862. During the Civil War, supported Lincoln's policies in general, and urged adoption of a broad and liberal post-war attitude toward the South and opposed Radical Republicans who wanted harsher measures against the South. A delegate to the 1865 National Republican Convention, he was made Chairman of the Republican National Committee, NY US Rep 1865-67. He agreed with President Johnson that Southern states were never out of the Union, in as much as the ordinances of secession were null. Raymond authored the Address and Declaration of Principles issued by the Aug. 1866 Loyalist Convention (or National Union Convention) at Philadelphia. He was removed from the Republican National Committee chairmanship 1866, and in 1867, his nomination as minister to Austria, which he already refused, was rejected by the Senate. He retired from public life in 1867 and devoted his time to newspaper work until his death. Editorially, Raymond sought a niche between Greeley's open partisanship and Bennett's party-neutrality. In addition to his work with the Times, he wrote several books, inc.: A Life of Daniel Webster 1853, Political Lessons of the Revolution 1854, A History of the Administration of President Lincoln 1864, and The Life and Public Services of Abraham Lincoln 1865. Autograph Sentiment (“Very truly yours”) Signed on 7 x 4 ½ sheet, New York, Feb. 3 1861.

Condition: Very good, light toning and aging, few tiny spots, 2 tiny fold separations at right side
Type:Autograph Sentiment Signed






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