Masaryk, Tomas G.

Early ALS in English of the Czechoslovak statesman, to London publisher Thomas Longman

Price: $450.00

Description:
(1850-1937) Austro-Hungarian and Czechoslovak politician, sociologist and philosopher, who as an eager advocate of Czechoslovak independence during WW I became the founder and 1st President of Czechoslovakia. Masaryk, born in Moravia, was appointed Professor of Philosophy in the Czech part of the University of Prague in 1882. Masaryk married American citizen Charlotte Garrigue in 1878, and took her family name as his middle name. Their son, Jan Masaryk, would serve as Foreign Minister in the Czechoslovak government-in-exile (1940–45) and in the governments of 1945-48. He founded “Athenaeum”, a magazine devoted to Czech culture and science, in 1883. He served in the Reichsrat (Austrian Parliament) 1891-93 in the Young Czech Party and from 1907-14 in the Realist Party. When World War I broke out in 1914, Masaryk determined to seek an independent country for Czechs and Slovaks, and that this could only be done from outside Austria-Hungary. He went into exile in Dec. 1914, to Rome, Geneva, London via Paris in 1915, Russia in May 1917 and the US via Vladivostok and Tokyo in April 1918. From Geneva onwards he started organizing Czechs and Slovaks living primarily in Switzerland, France, England, Russia and the US, establishing contacts that would prove crucial to the cause of Czechoslovak independence. In 1915 he was one of the first members of staff of the newly formed School of Slavonic and East European Studies, initially a department of King's College London, now a part of University College London, and where the Student Society and Senior Common Room are named after him. He became Professor of Slavic Research at King's College in London. During the war, Masaryk's network of Czech revolutionaries provided important and critical intelligence to the Allies. In 1916, Masaryk went to France to convince the French government of the necessity of disintegrating Austria-Hungary. After the February Revolution in 1917 he proceeded to Russia to help organize Slavic resistance to the Austrians, so-called Czechoslovak Legions. In 1918 he traveled to the US, where he convinced President Wilson of the rightness of his cause. Speaking on Oct. 26, 1918 from the steps of Independence Hall in Philadelphia as head of the Mid-European Union, Masaryk called for the independence of the Czechoslovaks and other oppressed peoples of Central Europe. On May 5, 1918 more than 150,000 Chicagoans filled the streets to give a triumphant welcome to Masaryk. Chicago was then the center of Czechoslovak immigration to the US and Masaryk had lectured at the University of Chicago in 1902 & 1907. With the fall of the Austro-Hungarian Empire in 1918, the Allies recognized Masaryk as head of the Provisional Czechoslovak government, and on Nov. 14, 1918, he was elected President of the Czechoslovak Federation by the National Assembly in Prague. He was re-elected in 1920, 1927, & 1934. After the rise of Hitler, he was one of the first political figures in Europe to voice concern. He resigned from office on Dec. 14, 1935 on the grounds of old age and poor health. Masaryk wrote several books, including “The Problems of Small Nations in the European Crisis” (1915) and “The World Revolution “ (1925 in Czech, published in English as “The Making of a State” in 1927). Karel Čapek wrote a series of articles entitled 'Hovory s TGM' (“Conversations with TGM”) later collected as a form of autobiography. The Order of Tomáš Garrigue Masaryk, a state decoration of the Czech Republic and in Czechoslovakia (estab. 1990), is awarded to individuals who have made outstanding contributions to humanity, democracy and human rights. Masaryk University in Brno, Czech Republic, founded in 1919 as the 2nd university of Czechoslovakia, is named for him. Streets are named for him in Mexico City, Tel Avia, Zagreb, Dubrovnik, Varaždin, Split, Belgrade, Novi Sad (Serbia), Ljubljana (Slovenia), Geneva and Bucharest. There are statues of Masaryk in Washington, Chicago, and San Francisco. 7 x 4 ½ ALS “TMasaryk” in English, Langham (England), March 23 (ny, but pre-1877), to publisher Thoms Longman, Patrernoster Row, London. Masaryk proposes to republish a work in one volume instead of two as before and asks Longman’s approval. Masaryk jokingly sends his compliments to Longman’s brother William “…who I presume is increasing the number of long men in England, as much as yourself.” The 2nd integral address page is neatly inlaid to 7 3/4 x 5 1/4, the address part visible on verso. Longman’s was a publishing company founded in London in 1724. It is now an imprint of Pearson Education. In 1842, brothers Thomas (1804–1879) & William (1813–1877) Longman took control of the business in Paternoster Row. The family control of the firm (later Longmans, Green & Co.) was continued by Thomas Norton Longman, son of Thomas Longman. In Dec. 1940, Longman's Paternoster Row offices were destroyed in The Blitz along with most of the company's stock. The company survived and became a public company in 1948.

Condition: Very good, light toning at left edge
Type:Letter






[View Shopping Cart]
[Home] [Articles] [Biography] [Calendar]
[Catalogue] [Search]



enbainc@cs.com

Edward N. Bomsey Autographs, Inc.
7317 Farr Street
Annandale, VA 22003-2516
(703) 642-2040(phone & fax)




Home
Home

Articles
Articles

Biography
Biography

Calendar
Calendar

Catalogue
Catalogue

Search
Search