Delano, Columbus

Rare 1872 AQS as Grant's Interior Secretary, likley inspired by the 1st African-American to speak in the US Capitol

Price: $110.00

Description:
(1809-1896) Ohio lawyer and statesman. He studied law, was admitted to the bar in 1831, practiced in Mount Vernon, and became Knox County prosecuting attorney. Elected to Congress as a Whig in 1844, then launching an unsuccessful bid for governor in 1847. Delano became an Ohio delegate to the 1860 Republican National Convention, supporting Abraham Lincoln's nomination as President. In 1861, he served as State commissary general and in 1862 ran for the US Senate, losing to Benjamin Wade. In 1863, he became a member of the State House of Representatives. He was appointed Commissioner of Internal Revenue in March 1869, serving to Nov. 1, 1870 when President Grant appointed him Secretary of the Interior. The corruption that permeated much of Grant's administration was especially rampant during Delano's tenure with bogus agents in the Bureau of Indian Affairs and fraudulent clerks in the Patent Office. He resigned on Oct.15, 1875 because of evidence that his son had been given partnerships in surveying contracts over which the Interior Department had control. In addition, Delano had taken bribes to secure fraudulent land grants. During his tenure as Secretary of the Interior, the town of Delano, California, was named in his honor. He was president of the First National Bank of Mount Vernon for the next 20 years. A long time trustee of Kenyon College in Gambier, Ohio, where an LL. D degree was conferred on him, he endowed Delano Hall. Rare AQS on 4 ¼ x 5 lined partial “Department of the Interior,/ Washington” letterhead, August 16 1872, signed with sentiment: “Enfranchise and educate”. Delano was likely inspired by Rev. Henry H. Garner’s historic 1865 sermon delivered in the House of Representatives. On Sunday, Feb. 12, 1865, Presbyterian minister Henry Highland Garner was asked by President Lincoln to deliver a sermon in the House of Representatives to commemorate the ratification of the 13th Amendment. For the 1st time in history, an African-American spoke in the Capitol. His final words in that sermon were: “Emancipate! Enfranchise! Educate! and give the blessings of the Gospel to every American citizen!"

Condition: Very good, faint stains at top right edge
Type:Autograph Quotation Signed






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