Aberdeen, 4th Earl (George Hamilton-Gordon)

1845 ALS while Peelís Foreign Minister

Price: $115.00 Special Offer - $95.00



Description:
George Hamilton-Gordon, 4th Earl of Aberdeen (1784-1860) Styled Lord Haddo 1791-1801. Edinburgh-born British politician and landowner, successively a Tory, Conservative and Peelite, Prime Minister of the United Kingdom 1852-55. He was appointed Chancellor of the University of Aberdeen in 1827 and was President of the Society of Antiquaries of London. He lost his father and his mother and was raised by Henry Dundas, 1st Viscount Melville. He was educated at Harrow, and St John's College, Cambridge. He became Earl of Aberdeen on his grandfather's death in 1801. In December 1805 he took his seat as a Tory Scottish peer in the House of Lords. In 1808, he was created a Knight of the Thistle. He was appointed Ambassador Extraordinary and Minister Plenipotentiary to Austria, and signed the Treaty of TŲplitz between Britain and Austria in Vienna in October 1813. He was one of the British representatives at the Congress of Ch‚tillon in February 1814, and at the negotiations which led to the Treaty of Paris in May of that year. Returning home he was created a peer of the United Kingdom as Viscount Gordon, of Aberdeen in the County of Aberdeen (1814), and made a member of the Privy Council. He served as Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster January-June 1828 and subsequently as Foreign Secretary until 1830 under the Duke of Wellington. He resigned with Wellington over the Reform Bill of 1832. He was Secretary of State for War and the Colonies 1834-35 and again Foreign Secretary 1841-46 under Sir Robert Peel. In his 2nd stint as Foreign Secretary he settled 2 disagreements with the US: the Northeast Boundary dispute by the Webster-Ashburton Treaty (1842), and the Oregon dispute by the Oregon Treaty of 1846. He also worked to improve relationships with France. He again followed his leader and resigned with Peel over the Corn Laws. After Peel's death in 1850 he became the recognized leader of the Peelites. In July 1852, a general election of Parliament was held which resulted in a "minority government under the Earl of Derby. The leadership of the minority government made the vote on the budget a "vote of confidence" and the defeat of the budget meant the downfall of the minority government and Lord Aberdeen was asked to form a new government from the coalition of Free Traders, Peelites and Whigs. The Earl of Aberdeen eventually led Britain into war on the side of the French/Ottomans against the Russian Empire. This war was called Crimean War, but the entire foreign policy negotiations surrounding the dismemberment of the Ottoman Empire, which continued throughout the middle and end of the 19th century was referred to as the "Eastern Question.Ē Aberdeen was ordinarily a sympathizer with Russian interests against French/Napoleonic interests. However, he succumbed to the pressure exerted on him from Palmerston and John Russell, both in favor of a more aggressive policy against perceived Russian expansion. However the Eastern Question and the resulting Crimean War proved to be the downfall of his government. Dissatisfaction as to the course of the war arose in England. On 29 January 1855, John Arthur Roebuck introduced a motion in Parliament or the appointment of a select committee to inquire into the conduct of the war. Treating this as a vote of no confidence in his government, Aberdeen resigned. ALS, 1 Ĺ pp (1st & 2nd pages of 7 ľ x 4 Ĺ folded sheet) while Peelís Foreign Minister, Argyll House (St. Jamesí, London), November 18 1845, to English antiquary Sir Harris Nicolas. Earl Aberdeen has sent Nicolasí letter to PM Peel for Peelís consideration for distribution of funds for literary merit to Nicolas which are at Peelís disposal. Earl Aberdeen sends Peelís response (not enclosed) and hopes his inability to do anything in the present year is less discouraging for the future. With blank integral leaf. Sir (Nicholas) Harris Nicolas (1799-1848). English antiquary. He was called to the bar at the Inner Temple in 1825. His work as a barrister was confined principally to peerage cases before the House of Lords, and he devoted the rest of his time to the study of genealogy and history. In 1831 he was made a knight of the Royal Guelphic Order, and in 1832 Chancellor and Knight-Commander of the Order of St Michael and St George, advanced to the grade of the Grand Cross in 1840. He became a member of the Council of the Society of Antiquaries in 1826, but withdrew in 1828. He criticized the Record Commission, which he regarded as too expensive. These attacks led in 1836 to the appointment of a select committee to inquire into the public records. Nicolas was also responsible for several reforms at the British Museum. Financial difficulties compelled Nicolas to leave England, and he died near Boulogne.

Condition: Very good, small hole at edge of integral leaf
Type:Letter






[View Shopping Cart]
[Home] [Articles] [Biography] [Calendar]
[Catalogue] [Search]



enbainc@cs.com

Edward N. Bomsey Autographs, Inc.
7317 Farr Street
Annandale, VA 22003-2516
(703) 642-2040(phone & fax)




Home
Home

Articles
Articles

Biography
Biography

Calendar
Calendar

Catalogue
Catalogue

Search
Search