Roxas, Manuel A.

1947 typed sentiment signed by the 1st President of the independent Philippine Republic

Price: $110.00

Description:
(1892-1948) First President of the independent Third Republic of the Philippines and 5th president overall, from the granting of independence in 1946 until his abrupt death in 1948. He was 3rd and last President of the Commonwealth and the 1st of the Republic of the Philippines. Roxas occupied more important positions in the Philippine government than any other Filipino ever before. He became the youngest governor of Capiz province 1919-22 and was elected to the House of Representatives in 1922, and for 12 consecutive years was Speaker of the House. He was member of the Constitutional Convention 1934-35. In 1941, he was elected to the Senate, but was unable to serve until 1945 because of the outbreak of WW II. As an officer in the reserves, he became liaison officer between the Commonwealth government and US Army Forces in the Far East headquarters of General MacArthur. He accompanied President Quezon to Corregidor where he supervised the destruction of Philippine currency to prevent its capture by the Japanese. When Quezon left Corregidor, he went to Mindanao to direct the resistance there. Prior to Quezon's departure he was made Executive Secretary and designated as successor to the presidency in case Quezon or Vice-President Osmeña were captured or killed. Roxas was captured (1942) by the Japanese. When the Congress convened in 1945, he was chosen Senate President. In the 1946 Philippine elections, Roxas ran for president as the nominee of the liberal wing of the Nacionalista Party with the staunch support of General MacArthur. In 1946, at the height of the last Commonwealth elections, Roxas and his friends left the Nacionalista Party and founded their own Liberal Party. Roxas then became the standard-bearer for presidency for the Liberal Party and Elpidio Quirino for vice-president. On April 23, 1946, Roxas and Quirino won the election. On May 8, 1946, President-elect Roxas, accompanied by US High Commissioner McNutt, enplaned for the US to discuss with American authorities the vital matters affecting the Philippines. On May 28, 1946, Roxas was inaugurated as the last President of the Commonwealth of the Philippines, witnessed by some 200,000 people. Roxas served as the President of the Commonwealth to July 4, 1946, the scheduled date of the proclamation of Philippine Independence. On June 3, 1946, Roxas appeared for the first time before the joint session of the Congress to deliver his first state of the nation address. His term as the President of the Commonwealth of the Philippines ended on the morning of July 4, 1946 when Roxas was inaugurated as 1st President of the new Republic. On the grandstand were some 3,000 guests and notables, inc. McNutt, the last US High Commissioner and 1st US Ambassador, and General Douglas MacArthur (coming from Tokyo). Reputed to be the most bombed and destroyed country in the world, the Philippines was in a sorry mess. Conservative estimates had it that the Philippines had lost about two thirds of her material wealth. The country was facing near bankruptcy, there was no national economy, no export trade. There was need of immediate aid from the UN Relief and Rehabilitation Administration which was obtained. Again, loans for the United States, as well as some increase in the national revenues, were to help the new Republic. Among the main remedies proposed was the establishment of the Philippine Rehabilitation Finance Corporation to construct 12,000 houses and for the grant of easy-term loans in the amount of 177M pesos. Another proposal was the creation of the Central Bank of the Philippines to help stabilize the Philippine dollar reserves and coordinate and the nations banking activities gearing them to the economic progress. Concentrating on the sugar industry, President Roxas would exert efforts in increasing production from 13,000 tons at the time of the Philippine liberation to an all-high of one million tons. In 1946, he proclaimed the Rice Share Tenancy Act of 1933 effective throughout the country. On January 28, 1948, he granted full amnesty to all so-called Philippine collaborators, many of whom were on trial or awaiting to be tried, particularly former President Jose P. Laurel (1943–1945). Utterly disgusted with the crimes being committed by the subversive HUKBALAHAP or HUKS, Roxas, on March 6, 1948, issued a Proclamation outlawing Huks' movement, making it a crime to belong to the same. On August 5, 1946, the Congress of the Philippines ratified the Treaty of General Relations with the US on July 4, 1946. The Treaty reserved for the US some bases for the mutual protection of both countries; consented that the US represent the Philippines in countries where the latter had not yet established diplomatic representation; made the Philippines assume all debts and obligations of the former government in the Philippines; and provided for the settlement of property rights of the citizens of both countries. The good record of Roxas administration was marred by the failure to curb graft and corruption in the government, the Chinese immigration scandal, the School supplies scandal; and the failure to check and stop the communist Hukbalahap movement. He did not finish his term that was expected to end by 1950 because he died of myocardial infarction. In his honor, Roxas District (Project 1) in Quezon City, Roxas, Capiz and Roxas, Isabela were named after him. Inscribed and signed typed sentiment (“With all good wishes, sincerely”) in English on 10 ½ x 8 “Malacanan Palace/Manila” letterhead, February 20 1947, to noted collector Ashley T. Cole. Scarce autograph as President! IMAGE NOTE: lighting has caused the image to show much darker stains which are quite light on the actual item!

Condition: Very good, 2 mail folds, slight clip indent and edge nick at top left, few very light opaque glue stains
Type:Typed Sentiment Signed






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