Walsh, David I.

Massachusetts’ 1st Irish-American & Catholic governor & US senator, chaired Senate Naval Affairs Committee in WW II

Price: $15.00

Description:
(1872-1947) Massachusetts Democrat, 46th Governor 1914–16, US Senator 1919–1925, 1926-47. He was the 1st Irish-American and 1st Catholic Governor of Massachusetts, and the state’s 1st Irish-Catholic US Senator. He failed to win reelection in 1924, the year of the Coolidge landslide, but with the death of Sen. Henry Cabot Lodge, was elected to complete the remaining 2 years of Lodge's term. He won reelection in 1928, 1934 & 1940, failing in his 1946 bid for reelection. During his Senate service, Walsh was chairman of the Committee on Education and Labor (73rd & 74th Congresses) and of the Committee on Naval Affairs (74th-77th & 79th Congresses). In 1932, he supported Al Smith against FDR for the Democratic nomination for president, objected to Justice Hugo Black's failure to disclose his earlier membership in the Ku Klux Klan, and promoted the appointment of Jews to the judiciary, notably that of Supreme Court Justice Louis Brandeis, a longtime friend. Though a Democrat, he gave only reluctant support to President Roosevelt's agenda. In 1936, he lent his name to an Administration bill to establish labor standards for employees of government contractors, the Walsh–Healey Public Contracts Act, which provided for minimum wages and overtime, safety and sanitation rules, and restrictions on the use of child and convict labor. In 1937, he opposed FDR's plan to enlarge the Supreme Court and with 4 of his colleagues, condemned anti-Semitism in Nazi Germany in a Senate speech on June 10, 1933. Immediately after the defeat of France, Walsh co-sponsored the Vinson-Walsh Act of July 1940 that increased the size of the Navy by 70%, including 7 battleships, 18 aircraft carriers and 15,000 aircraft. Walsh was a consistent isolationist, supporting neutrality with respect to the Spanish Civil War and opposing any alliance with the United Kingdom until the attack on Pearl Harbor. At the 1940 Democratic Convention, Walsh supported James Farley for president rather than FDR and with fellow isolationist Senator Burton Wheeler of Montana proposed an isolationist plank for the party platform. In the 1940 election, he out-polled FDR in Massachusetts despite being opposed by the CIO for his anti-New Deal positions. After the 1940 election, he opposed any action to compromise US neutrality, first in closed-door hearings of the Naval Affairs Committee, which he headed, and then in attacking the Lend-Lease program on the floor of the Senate. He was a leading member of the America First movement. In June, 1940, he authored an amendment to the naval appropriations bill, the Walsh Act of 1940, which permitted "surplus military equipment" to be sold only if it was certified as useless for American defense. To aid Great Britain, the Administration evaded the Walsh provision by substituting leases for sales and by trading equipment for bases. In 1945, however, Walsh voted in favor of the United Nations Charter. He was defeated in 1946 by Henry Cabot Lodge, Jr. A bronze statue of him was erected near the Music Oval on Boston's Charles River Esplanade in 1954. His alma mater, Holy Cross, awards an annual scholarship in his name. 3 x 4 ˝ card signed as Massachusetts US Senator, undated but early-mid 1940s.

Condition: Very good, light uniform toning, pale corners
Type:Signed Card






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