Sedgwick, Catharine M.

Autographed note signed by of one of the early 19th century’s major female writers, noted for “domestic fiction”

Price: $150.00

Description:
(1789-1867) American novelist of "domestic fiction", promoted Republican motherhood. Called “the first noted female writer in America”, Sedgwick published nearly a dozen novels, but was also active in the Womens Prison Association of New York. Her father was Theodore Sedgwick (1746–1813), Mass. US Rep & Senator, 5th Speaker of the US House of Representatives (1799-1801), appointed a justice of the state Supreme Judicial Court in 1802. As a child, Sedgwick was cared for by Elizabeth Freeman, a former slave whose freedom her father helped gain by arguing her case in county court in 1781. Sedgwick attended finishing school in Boston to complete her education. As a young woman, she took charge of a school in Lenox. She converted from Calvinism to Unitarianism, which led her to write a pamphlet denouncing religious intolerance. This further inspired her to write her 1st novel, “A New-England Tale.” With her work much in demand from the 1820s to the 1850s, Sedgwick made a good living writing short stories for a variety of periodicals. Interest in her work and an appreciation of her contribution to American literature was stimulated by the late 20th century's feminist movement. She became one of the most notable female novelists of her time. She wrote work in American settings, and combined patriotism with protests against historic Puritan oppressiveness. Her topics contributed to the creation of a national literature, enhanced by her detailed descriptions of nature. Sedgwick created spirited heroines who did not conform to the stereotypical conduct of women at the time. Her 3rd novel, “Hope Leslie” (1827), recounted a dramatic conflict between the British Empire, colonists and Native Americans. The book earned a large readership and established the author's reputation in both the United States and Great Britain. “Clarence; or, A Tale of Our Own Times” (1830) is a novel of manners set in New York City, parts of the novel also take place in England, Jamaica, and Trenton Falls, a popular tourist destination in New York state. Critical reception of the novel in America was mostly positive, reviews of the novel in England were mixed. “The Linwoods; or, 'Sixty Years Since' in America” (1835) is an historical romance set during the American Revolution that shed light on American character and national identity in the early republic by exploring America's relationship with Britain and France. “Live and Let Live; or, Domestic Service Illustrated” (1837) depicts the ideal workplaces for working-class women to develop domestic skills. Sedgwick's expression of relations between mistress-employer and housekeepers reflects a return to aristocratic class relations, but one that includes employer respect for the employee's humanity and political rights. In her final novel, “Married or Single” (1857), she put forth the bold idea that women should not marry if it meant they would lose their self-respect (but she married off her heroine). 5 x 4 Autographed Note Signed (ANS) “C M Sedgwick”, Saratoga Springs (NY), August 5 (no year),complying with a young man’s request for her autograph.

Condition: Very good, trifle light, slight wrinkling
Type:ANS






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