Legare, Hugh S.

3rd person ALS of the future Tyler Attorney General (died in office) while So. Carolina Congressman

Price: $85.00

Description:
(1797-1843) So. Carolina lawyer, legal scholar, US Attorney General (Tyler). A severe physical deformity due to a vaccine poisoning suffered before he was 5 (permanently arresting the growth and development of his legs) kept him from strenuous physical activity, so he turned to scholarly pursuits, at which he excelled. He studied at Moses Waddel's Academy and the College of South Carolina, graduating in 1814. He worked toward degrees in law and languages in the US (1814–17) and in Scotland (1818–19). Legare's interest in Roman and civil law was developed at Edinburgh University. He wrote extensively on law, legal philosophy, and classical literature throughout his life. As a young man, he partnered with botanist Steven Elliot, Sr., and other prominent Charleston intellectuals to establish a quarterly magazine devoted to all disciplines of scholarly writing, “The Southern Review,” and was a principal contributor until the death of his partner and the demands of his political career caused it to fold. Shortly after his 1819 return to the US, he was elected to the state legislature from St. John’s Island. In 1822, back in Charleston, he practiced law and campaigned for reelection to the state legislature from Charleston. He served 1824-30, when he was named state attorney general. While attorney general, the nullification crisis in South Carolina came to a head. Legare opposed the nullification group, spoke on behalf of the Union, and cautioned the federal government against any exercise of authority that might stir the citizens to secession. For his efforts, he was named chargé d'affaires in Brussels in 1832. Legare returned home in fall 1836, was elected as a Union Democrat to Congress, but was defeated in 1838. Legare returned to Charleston and the practice of law and authoring articles on Demosthenes, Athenian democracy, and Roman law. During the 1840 presidential campaign he affiliated with the Whigs, and supported Harrison and later Tyler. President Tyler named Legare Attorney General in 1841. Because of his experience in Belgium and his thorough knowledge of both civil and International Law, Legare was a highly regarded member of the Cabinet. As Attorney General, Legare replaced Daniel Webster on the Ashburton Treaty Commission and is credited with contributing important portions of the treaty that pertained to the right of search. When Webster resigned as Secretary of State in May 1843, Legare was named Secretary ad interim. On June 20, 1843, he died suddenly while accompanying President Tyler to the dedication of the Bunker Hill monument in Boston. 3rd person 8 x 5 ALS, Washington, April 7 1838, sending his autograph to a Saratoga Springs, New York collector: “Mr. Legaré has very great pleasure in complying with the request addressed to him in such flattering terms by Mr. Davison, to whom he offers his compliments & good wishes.”

Condition: Very good, minor wrinkling
Type:Letter






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