Schurz, Carl

German-born diplomat, Civil War general, Missouri US Senator, Secretary of the Interior (Hayes), journalist

Price: $40.00

Description:
(1829-1906) German revolutionary, American statesman and reformer, diplomat, Civil War General, Missouri US Senator 1869-75, Secretary of the Interior 1877-81 (Hayes), accomplished journalist, newspaper editor and orator. At 19, Schurz led an 1848 German student movement to encourage democracy. He went into exile on its defeat. In 1852, he emigrated to the US and moved to Wisconsin, where he joined, and campaigned for, the Republican Party. In the 1858 Illinois Senate campaign, he spoke on behalf of Lincoln, mostly in German, which raised Lincoln's popularity among German-Americans. In 1861, President Lincoln appointed him Minister to Spain, and succeeded in dissuading Spain from supporting the South during the Civil War. In 1862, Schurz was named Brigadier General by President Lincoln. Promoted Major General Vols., he commanded a division in Howard's XI Corps at Gettysburg. At the end of the War he was chief of staff of Henry Slocum's Army of Georgia. He resigned when the War ended. In 1867, he moved to St. Louis, becoming editor and joint proprietor of the Westliche Post (Western Post), and spoke against repudiation of war debts and for the gold standard during the 1868 presidential campaign. In 1868, he was elected to the Senate from Missouri, 1st German American senator. He advocated fiscal responsibility, anti-imperialism, and government integrity. He opposed federal military enforcement and protection of African American civil rights. He broke with the Grant administration, starting the Liberal Republican movement in Missouri, which in 1870 elected B. Gratz Brown governor. In 1872, he presided over the Liberal Republican convention, which nominated Horace Greeley for President. In 1875, he campaigned for R. B. Hayes for Ohio governor, and, in 1876, supported Hayes for President. Hayes named him Secretary of the Interior, following much of his advice in other appointments and in his Inaugural address. Schurz stressed merit in the Civil Service, permitting no removals except for cause, and requiring competitive exams for clerkship candidates. His efforts to remove political patronage met with only limited success. He prosecuted land thieves and brought attention to the necessity of forest preservation. Although he honestly attempted to reduce effects of racism toward Native Americans, they were moved into low quality reservation lands unsuitable for tribal economic and cultural advancement. During his tenure, there was a movement, supported by Gen. Sherman, successsfully opposed by Schurz, to transfer the Office of Indian Affairs to the War Department. He instituted a wide-scale inspection of the Office, dismissed several officials, and began reforms. He continued resettling tribes on reservations, but later changed his mind and promoted an assimilationist policy. On leaving office Schurz worked as an editor for various newspapers in New York City. In 1884, he was a leader in the Independent (or Mugwump) movement against the nomination of Blaine for president and for the election of Grover Cleveland. In 1892, he succeeded George Wm. Curtis as president of the National Civil Service Reform League to 1901. He succeeded Curtis as editorial writer for Harper's Weekly 1892-98. During his later years, Schurz was perhaps the most prominent independent in US politics, noted for high principles, avoidance of political partisanship, and his moral conscience. Schurz is memorialized in numerous places around the US, including Carl Schurz Park in New York City, site of Gracie Mansion, residence of the Mayor of New York. Schurz, Nevada named after him, as are several places in Wisconsin, Missouri and Germany. Mount Schurz, in eastern Yellowstone, was named in 1885 by the US Geological Survey, to honor Schurz's commitment to protecting Yellowstone National Park In 1983, the US Postal Service issued a 4c stamp to honor him. 2 x 6 fragment of an autograph album page signed as Missouri US Senator, undated but ca. 1869-70.

Condition: Very good
Type:Signature






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