Jackson, James Caleb

Abolitionist & health reformer, hydropathy advocate, invented 1st dry, whole grain breakfast cereal

Price: $30.00

Description:
(1811-1895) Manlius, New York-born inventor of the 1st dry, whole grain breakfast cereal, which he called “granula.” In his early life, he was an abolitionist and lectured for the Massachusetts Anti-Slavery Society, becoming the Society's secretary in 1840. From 1844 he moved into journalism, buying the abolitionist newspaper, the Albany Patriot, with Abel Brown. Jackson continued to manage and write for the paper until 1847 when failing health forced him to retire. Troubled with ill health throughout his life, he saw a remarkable recovery after taking a “water cure” at a spa. He spent the 2nd half of his life as an advocate for hydropathy, training to become a doctor and opening a hydropathic institute on Skaneateles Lake, New York, in 1847. In 1858 he took over the “Our Home Hygienic Institute” at Dansville, New York, founded by Nathaniel Bingham on the site of a mineral water spring, some 4 years earlier. Under Jackson's management, the spa became one of the largest in the world, catering for some 20,000 patients, renamed “Our Home on the Hillside.” Along with the water cures, Jackson came to believe that diet was fundamental in improving health. Over time, he removed red meat from the menu at the spa, and ruled out tea, coffee, alcohol and tobacco. He promoted a near vegetarian diet with emphasis on fruits, vegetables, and unprocessed grains. His views influenced the health reforms of Ellen G. White, founder of the Seventh-day Adventist Church. In 1863 he developed the first breakfast cereal which he named Granulacerelomia, or, Granula. It was the first manufactured breakfast cereal, and could be described as being a larger and tougher version of the somewhat similar later cereal Grape-Nuts. Granula however, consisted primarily of bran-rich Graham flour made into nugget shapes. The cereal had to be soaked overnight before it could be eaten. It was manufactured from a dough of Graham flour rolled into sheets and baked. The dried sheets were then broken into pieces, baked again, and broken into smaller pieces. “Granola” was a later breakfast cereal developed by John Harvey Kellogg, renamed to avoid being sued by Jackson. Kellogg incorporated a rolling process to flake the grain, making it more edible. It was revived in the 1960s as a somewhat similar breakfast cereal. Some of Jackson’s publications include: “Hints on the Reproductive Organs: Their Diseases, Causes, and Cure on Hydropathic Principles” (1853); “The Sexual Organization and its Healthy Management” (1861); “Consumption: How to prevent It, and How to cure It” (1862); “How to treat the Sick without Medicine” (1870); “American Womanhood: Its Peculiarities and Necessities” (1870); “The Training of Children” (1872); “The Debilities of Our Boys” (1872); and, “Christ as a Physician” (1875). Close of an ALS on 1 ½ x 4 lined piece, mounted to 3 x 6 autograph album page fragment; scarce autograph!

Condition: Very good
Type:Signature






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