Ferry, Orris S.

Connecticut US Rep & Senator, Brigadier General in Civil War, at Battle of Winchester, Valley & Peninsula campaigns

Price: $25.00

Description:
(1823-1875) Connecticut Republican US Rep 1859-61 & Senator 1867-75, Brigadier General in the Civil War. 1844 Yale graduate, he was an editor of the Yale Literary Magazine and a member of Skull and Bones. Admitted to the bar in 1846, he was commissioned a Lieut. Colonel in the 12th Regiment of state Militia 1847. Ferry became a Republican in 1856, and campaigned for Frémont. In 1859, he was elected to Congress where gave numerous speeches against slavery. He was Connecticut's representative to the Committee of Thirty-Three, created in the hope that peace could be settled between the Northern and Southern states. In 1861, he was denied re-election. At the outbreak of the Civil War, Ferry volunteered as part of the initial defense of Washington. On July 23, 1861, he was put in command of the 5th Connecticut Vol. Infantry, and given the rank of Colonel. In early March 1862, Ferry led his troops across the Potomac and attacked the Confederates at Winchester. He was promoted to Brigadier General March 17, 1862, then put under command of Gen. James Shields, whose division joined that of Gen. McDowell. It was under McDowell that Ferry fought at the First Battle of Winchester. He continued to serve under Shields during the Valley Campaign. Shortly after the Battle of Winchester, his regiment was put under command of Major General Banks. On Aug. 9, Ferry encountered Stonewall Jackson at Cedar Mountain, the battle ending in a Confederate victory. He served in the VII, X, & XVIII Corps, headed the District of Lehigh Aug. 1863-May 1864, and led the District of Philadelphia Dec.1864-July 1865. He was brevetted Major General for the Peninsula Campaign. He resigned after the Confederate surrender. In 1866, he defeated Lafayette S. Foster and took his place in the Senate in 1867. He favored amnesty for members of the Confederacy, participated in the impeachment of President Johnson, voting to convict. He was chairman of the Committee to Audit and Control the Contingent Expenses 1870-71, chairman of the Committee on Patents 1871-75, and served on the Senate Committee on Health, Education, Labor, and Pensions. In 1874, Ferry gave a speech against the future Civil Rights Act of 1875. The Act eventually passed, but was held unconstitutional by the Supreme Court on the basis that Congress did not have the power to regulate the conduct of individuals. Signed 2 ˝ x 4 ˝ slip, adds “Conn” under signature, likely while US Senator. Undated but ca. 1869.

Condition: Very good, slight spot at 2nd “n”
Type:Signature






[View Shopping Cart]
[Home] [Articles] [Biography] [Calendar]
[Catalogue] [Search]



enbainc@cs.com

Edward N. Bomsey Autographs, Inc.
7317 Farr Street
Annandale, VA 22003-2516
(703) 642-2040(phone & fax)




Home
Home

Articles
Articles

Biography
Biography

Calendar
Calendar

Catalogue
Catalogue

Search
Search