Schenck, Robert C.

Ohio US Rep 1843-51 & 1863-71, diplomat, Major General in Virginia & Maryland

Price: $35.00

Description:
(1809-1890) Ohio Union general in the Civil War, at both battles of Bull Run, the 1862 Valley Campaign, and the Battle of Cross Keys. Minister to Brazil and the United Kingdom. He studied law under Thomas Corwin, admitted to the bar in 1831, and moved to Dayton. In the 1840 presidential campaign, he acquired the reputation of being one of the ablest Whig speakers. US Rep 1843-51, he was he was chairman of the Committee on Roads and Canals 1847-49. He helped repeal the “gag rule” long used to prevent antislavery petitions being read on the floor of the House and opposed the Mexican-American War as a war of aggression to further slavery. He was appointed Minister to Brazil in March 1851 by President Fillmore, also accredited to Uruguay, the Argentine Confederation, and Paraguay. In 1854, he returned to Ohio and became sympathetic to the Republican Party. In Sept. 1859, he delivered a speech in Dayton recommending that the Republicans nominate Abraham Lincoln for the presidency, perhaps, the first public endorsement of Lincoln for the presidency. He supported Lincoln at the 1860 Chicago Convention and in the campaign that followed. After Fort Sumter, Schenck was commissioned Brigadier General of Volunteers, commanding the 1st Ohio Volunteer Infantry Regiment. At the First Battle of Bull Run, July 21, 1861, led a brigade in General Daniel Tyler's division. He was subsequently under Major General Rosecrans in West Virginia, and under Major General Fremont in the Luray Valley. He took part in the Shenandoah Valley Campaign of 1862, the Battle of Cross Keys and was, for a time, commander of the I Corps, in Major General Sigel's absence. He joined the Army of Virginia under Major General Pope just before the Second Battle of Bull Run, and severely wounded on the 2nd day, his right arm permanently injured. He was promoted to Major General (Vols) Sept. 18, 1862, to rank from Aug. 30. He was unfit for field duty for 6 months, but was assigned to command VIII Corps, embracing Maryland, repressing all turbulence, acts of disloyalty, or any complicity with treason. In Dec. 1863, he resigned his commission to sit in Congress, elected by a large majority over Copperhead Democrat Clement Vallandigham. He made House Chairman of the Committee on Military Affairs. He served to 1871, was a leader of the House, and was Chairman of the Ways and Means Committee. Schenck was appointed Minister to the United Kingdom by President Grant and was a member of the Alabama Claims Commission. At a royal party in Somerset, Schenck was persuaded to write down his rules for poker, the first book to deal solely with draw poker published on either side of the Atlantic. The game quickly became popular in England, where it was universally known as "Schenck's poker." In Oct. 1871, he was paid for the use of his name in the sale of stock in England for the Emma Silver Mine in Utah, and when share prices crashed when it was learned the mine was exhausted. Schenck was ordered home for investigation. He resigned in the spring of 1875. A congressional investigation in March 1876 concluded he was not guilty of wrongdoing but had shown very bad judgment in lending his name and office to promote such scheme. Upon his return from England later that year, he resumed his law practice in Washington and published a book on draw poker. Signature on 2 ¼ x 6 ½ slip, adds “Dayton, Ohio”. Undated but ca. 1869.

Condition: Very good
Type:Signature






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