Smith, Sidney

Signed original sketch of Tilda, The Gumps’ annoying maid

Price: $150.00

Description:
(1877-1935) Illinois-born creator of the influential comic strip, “The Gumps”, based on an idea by Joseph M. Patterson, editor and publisher of the Chicago Tribune. Smith began drawing cartoons for his hometown newspaper at 18. In 1908, he became a sports cartoonist at the Chicago Examiner where he created a feature, “Buck Nix” which involved continuity. In 1911, he moved to the Chicago Tribune, where he introduced “Old Doc Yak” as a daily on Feb. 5, 1912, the Sunday page starting March 10. The last “Old Doc Yak” ended Feb. 10, 1917 with the well-dressed Yak and family leaving their house, wondering who might next move into it. The last panel showed the empty house. On Feb. 12, 1917, newspapers displayed the initial episodes of “The Gumps”, showing them moving into the same house. “The Gumps” had a 42-year run in newspapers, until Oct.17, 1959. The strip, its merchandising (toys, games, a popular song, toys, games, playing cards, food products) and media adaptations made Smith a very wealthy man. On June 5, 1920, “Andy's Dancing Lesson”, the first of dozens of animated cartoons was released. In 1931, “The Gumps” became the 1st comic strip adapted into a radio show. It was adapted into a live-action/animated film series in 1920-21. In 1922, Smith signed a million-dollar contract ($100,000/ year for 10 years). Two years later, he published the 183-page “Andy Gump, His Life Story” (1924). In 1935, he signed a new contract, giving him $150,000 a year. On his way home from signing this contract, he crashed his new Rolls-Royce and died at age 58. Smith started out just doing daily gags about life in and around the Gump household, but gradually moved toward longer and more complex storylines, and it became an early example of a soap opera. On June 16, 1919, Patterson launched The New York Daily News, and “The Gumps” was the only Tribune strip in it from the start. Many newspaper feature editors wanted it for their own papers. To meet that demand, Patterson formed The Chicago Tribune-New York News Syndicate. The strip's popularity increased as Andy ran for Congress in 1922, and for president in nearly every election from 1924 until the strip ended. Signed, hand-drawn black ink original sketch of Tilda, the Gumps’ maid, shouting her trademark line “Soup’s On!”, at the left side of an early, 3 ½ x 6 attractive, red & blue printed air mail envelope. Undated.

Condition: Very good, slight stain see-thru, penciled notes on verso
Type:Signed Original Sketch






[View Shopping Cart]
[Home] [Articles] [Biography] [Calendar]
[Catalogue] [Search]



enbainc@cs.com

Edward N. Bomsey Autographs, Inc.
7317 Farr Street
Annandale, VA 22003-2516
(703) 642-2040(phone & fax)




Home
Home

Articles
Articles

Biography
Biography

Calendar
Calendar

Catalogue
Catalogue

Search
Search