Jackson, Henry M.

1970 TLS to Senator Ed Muskie, thanking him for his wire on Jackson’s re-election

Price: $25.00

Description:
(1912-1983) Washington State Democratic Congressman and Senator from 1941 until his death. He was an unsuccessful candidate for the Democratic presidential nomination in 1972 & 1976. He was nicknamed "Scoop" by his sister in his childhood after a comic strip character he is said to have resembled. He received a law degree from the University of Washington, was elected prosecuting attorney for Snohomish County 1938-40 and made a name for himself prosecuting bootleggers and gamblers. He successfully ran for Congress as a Democrat in 1940 and took his seat with the 77th Congress Jan. 3, 1941. From that date forward, Jackson did not lose a congressional election. He joined the Army when the US entered WW II, but left when President Roosevelt ordered all Congressmen to return home or resign their seats. In 1952, he was elected to the US Senate and served for over 30 years. Though he opposed Joe McCarthy’s the excesses, he also criticized Dwight Eisenhower for not spending enough on national defense, and called for more inter-continental ballistic missiles in the national arsenal. Jackson boasted one of the strongest records during the civil rights movement. In 1963, Jackson was made chairman of the Committee on Interior and Insular Affairs, which became the Committee on Energy and Natural Resources in 1977, a position he held to 1981. He authored the National Environmental Policy Act and was a leader of the fight for statehood for Alaska & Hawaii. In 1974, he co-sponsored the Jackson-Vanik amendment in the Senate that denied normal trade relations to certain countries with non-market economies that restricted the freedom of emigration; the amendment was intended to help Jews emigrate from the Soviet Bloc. Jackson led the opposition within the Democratic Party against the SALT II Treaty, and was a leading proponent of increased foreign aid to Israel. Jackson and Democratic colleague Warren Magnuson were one of the most effective delegations in Senate history in terms of "bringing home the bacon" for their state. Washington State received nearly one sixth of public works appropriations though it ranked 23rd in population. He was often criticized for his support for the Vietnam War and his close ties to the defense industries of his state. Opponents derided him as "the Senator from Boeing” because of his consistent support for additional military spending on weapons systems and accusations of wrongful contributions from the company. He was chairman of the Democratic National Committee in 1960 and was considered for the VP spot that went to Lyndon Johnson. Jackson ran for president twice; his campaigns were noted for the hostile reception they received from the left wing of the Democratic Party. In 1972, his name was placed in nomination by Georgia Governor Jimmy Carter and he finished 2nd in the delegate roll call, well behind nominee George McGovern. Jackson raised his national profile by speaking out on US-USSR relations and Middle East policy regularly, and was considered a front-runner for the 1976 nomination. His support of the Vietnam War resulted in hostility from the Democratic left. He chose to run on social issues, emphasizing law and order and his opposition to busing. Though he won the Massachusetts and New York primaries, he dropped out on May 1 after losing the Pennsylvania primary to Carter by 12 points and running out of money. He was awarded the Presidential Medal of Freedom posthumously in 1984 by Ronald Reagan who called him "one of the greatest lawmakers of our century." Jackson believed evil should be confronted with power. His support for civil rights and equality at home, his opposition to détente, his support for human rights and democratic allies, and his firm belief that the US could be a force for good in the world, inspired a legion of loyal aides who went on to propound Jackson's philosophy as part of neoconservatism, many becoming Republicans. TLS “Scoop” on 8 ¼ x 6 ¼ United States Senate letterhead, Washington, November 16 1970, to Hon. Edmund S. Muskie, US Senate. Jackson is sorry he was delayed in thanking muskie for his wire regarding Jackson’s election, having just returned from the NATO Parliamentarians meeting in the Netherlands. It was “…terribly kind and thoughtful of you to send such a wonderful message” and he is “…most grateful for the across-the-board support I received in both the primary and the general elections.” EDMUND S. MUSKIE (1914-1986) Maine Democratic US Senator 1959-80. 1968 VP candidate with Humphrey, 1972 presidential hopeful. Secretary of State 1980-81 (Carter).

Condition: Very good, “Buzz” inked at top right, ink check mark at lower left
Type:Letter






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