Fowler, Joseph S. & Patterson, David T.

Tennessee’s 1st US Senators on 1866 readmission to the Union, both voted “not guilty” in impeachment of trial Andrew Johnson

Price: $75.00

Description:
JOSEPH S. FOWLER (1820-1902) Ohio-born Tennessee “carpetbag” US Senator 1866-71.He taught at Franklin College in Davidson County, Tennessee 1845-49, studied law in Kentucky and was subsequently admitted to the bar and practiced in Tennessee until 1861. He also served as president of Howard Female College in Gallatin, Tennessee 1856-61. An ardent Unionist, he was State Comptroller 1862-65. In 1866 Tennessee became the 1st former Confederate state to be readmitted to the Union; the General Assembly elected him to the Senate, serving from July 24, 1866, and Fowler became a part of the majority Republican caucus. During President Andrew Johnson's impeachment trial, Fowler and 6 other Republican senators broke party ranks and in a courageous act of political suicide, voted for Johnson’s acquittal: Fowler, William Pitt Fessenden, James W. Grimes, John B. Henderson, Lyman Trumbull, Peter G. Van Winkle, and Edmund G. Ross of Kansas (who provided the decisive vote). After the trial, Ben Butler conducted hearings on widespread reports that these senators were bribed to vote for Johnson's acquittal. In Butler's hearings, and in subsequent inquiries, there was evidence that some acquittal votes were acquired by promises of patronage jobs and cash. Fowler did not seek another term in the Senate after his term expired, and did not return to Tennessee but remained in Washington practicing law. DAVID T. PATTERSON (1818-1891) Tennessee US Senator at the beginning of the Reconstruction Period. He "read the law" with a local attorney and after being admitted to the bar in 1841, he practiced in Greeneville and also engaged in manufacturing. He was a state judge 1854-63 and also acquired substantial amounts of land in East Tennessee and grew commodity crops. In 1855, Patterson married Martha Johnson, daughter of Andrew Johnson and his wife Eliza. A staunch Union supporter (as were most East Tennesseans), he was elected by the General Assembly to the Senate on Tennessee’s re-admission to the Union on July 24, 1866. His father-in-law Andrew Johnson had succeeded as President following Lincoln's assassination the year before. Johnson’s impeachment by the House in February 1868 caused Patterson great personal conflict. He voted not to convict his father-in-law after the Senate tried Johnson on the charges March-May 1868. The vote was one short of the constitutional requirement of a two-thirds majority. The Senate agreed to let President Pro tempore Benjamin Wade vote (he had a vested interest in the outcome as he would have succeeded to the presidency, there being no Vice President) to balance Patterson’s expected “not guilty” vote. He retired from public life when his term expired on March 4, 1869, along with that of his father-in-law's as president. He returned to East Tennessee to manage his relatively vast agricultural interests. Two 2 x 6 ½ signatures on separate pieces from an autograph album each adding “Tennessee” under their signatures.

Condition: Very good
Type:Signatures






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