Forsyth, John

The Secretary of State warns the US Consul at Guayaquil, Ecuador to send a legally required bond or face dismissal by the President!

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Description:
(1780-1841) Virginia US Rep 1813-18 & 1823-27, Senator 1818-19 & 1829-34. Minister to Spain 1819-23, gained Spanish king’s ratification of treaty of 1819 ceding Florida to US. 33rd Georgia Governor 1827-29, he led the pro-removal reply to Theodore Frelinghuysen as to the Indian Removal Act of 1830. He was Secretary of State 1834-41 (Jackson-Van Buren) and led the government's response to the Amistad case. He was a loyal follower of Andrew Jackson and opposed John C. Calhoun on the issue of nullification though he supported slavery and was a slaveholder himself. Forsyth County, Georgia is named for him. 13 x 8 LS while Van Buren’s Secretary of State, “Duplicate” written at top left, Department of State, Washington, April 9 1840, to Seth Sweetser, US Consul at Guayaquil, Ecuador. Forsyth warns Sweetser that the failure of Consuls, including Sweetser, ”…to give the Bond required by Law…” has been brought to President Van Buren’s notice, and the President has directed Secretary Forsyth to inform those not in compliance that unless they immediately send their bonds to the State Department, the President will remove them from their Consulates. Sweetser is given 12 months to comply, however. The US recognized the independence of Colombia (of which Ecuador, or Equator, was a part) from Spain on June 19, 1822. The 1st US consul was appointed in 1824 at Guayaquil, confirmed by the Senate in 1825. He was recognized by the Intendente of the Department of Guayaquil, General Juan Paz Castillo, on July 5, 1825. Ecuador withdrew from the Colombian federation in 1830 and received US recognition as a separate state in 1832. The US effectively recognized Ecuador in an 1832 letter from Secretary of State Livingston to President Flores. Another indication came in May 12, 1834 instructions to the Chargé d’Affaires in New Granada with which the State Department transmitted the commission of Seth Sweetser as Consul in Guayaquil. The dispatch referred to Guayaquil as a city “in Ecuador,” and asked the Chargé to tell Sweetser to “apply to the Government of that State for his Exequatur.” Sweetser presented his commission to the President of Ecuador and accepted his exequatur on Feb. 24, 1835. The 1st major US-Ecuador agreement was a commercial treaty signed June 13, 1839, ratifications exchanged at Quito April 9, 1842, the treaty effective Sept. 23, 1842.

Condition: Very good, folds, slight creasing to top right corner
Type:Letter






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