Arno, Peter

Autograph sentiment signed by the great “New Yorker” cartoonist

Price: $95.00

Description:
(b. Curtis Arnoux Peters, 1904-1968) Cartoonist whose satirical drawings, particularly of New York café society, did much to establish “The New Yorker” magazine’s reputation for sophisticated humor. He attended the venerable Hotchkiss boarding school and Yale University where he organized his own band, developing a reputation as a playboy. After leaving school he settled in New York's Greenwinch Village, submitted art to numerous publications, and painted decorative panels for restaurants. He made arrangements to return to music when a drawing he submitted to the new magazine, "The New Yorker," was purchased, debuting in the four-month old publication in June 1925. The association with the magazine continued his entire life. In the late 20s, Arno’s cartoons for “The New Yorker”, dealing with the city’s aristocracy, became well known. In 1927, his 1st book, "Whoops Dearie!” was published, and he authored 4 cartoon books by 1931. In 1931 co-authored “Here Comes the Bride”, a musical satire produced in October of that year. Arno played an active part in the world he satirized. Lecherous clubmen and sabled dowagers appeared frequently in his cartoons. His classic 1936 cartoon, “Let's go to the Trans-Lux and hiss Roosevelt!” lampoons a group of middle-aged socialites hissing at President Roosevelt at the Trans-Lux, a popular New York theater. Until 1962, his work also appeared in Barnum & Bailey‘s "Circus Magazine". Collections of his cartoons include: "Peter Arno's Circus" (1931); "Cartoon Revue" (1941); "Man in the Shower" (1944); “Sizzling Platter” (1949); "Hell of a Way to Run a Railroad" (1951); and, "Lady in the Shower" (1967). He was included in the New York Public Library's exhibit of celebrity caricatures from the Golden Age of this satiric art, focusing on caricatures of the 1920s-50s. An apparent rennaisance man, he was said to have written a song ("My Heart Is On My Sleeve"), designed and built an automobile he called "Albatross," and wrote a western melodrama mentioned in "Look" magazine in 1949. Frameable 2 ¾ x 5 ¼ autograph sentiment (“with best wishes”) signed on blank verso of part of a letter requesting an autograph.

Condition: Very good
Type:Autograph Sentiment Signed






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