Brown, James

1993 in-person Autograph Sentiment Signed by “The Godfather of Soul”

Price: $175.00

Description:
(1933-2006) ”The Godfather of Soul”, South Carolina-born African-American singer, songwriter, musician, recording artist, originator of Funk music, major figure of 20th century popular music and dance. In a career that spanned 6 decades, Brown moved on a continuum of blues and gospel-based forms and styles to a profoundly "Africanized" approach to music making. He charted the most singles on the Billboard Hot 100 without ever hitting #1. For many years, his touring show was one of the most extravagant productions in popular music. He employed 40-50 people for the James Brown Revue, performing upwards of 330 shows a year, almost all one-nighters, which let him call himself “the hardest working man in show business.” He was inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame in 1986 (one of the 1st inductees) and the Songwriters Hall of Fame in 1990. He dropped out of school in the 7th grade and taught himself to play a harmonica, some guitar, piano and drums. In 1955, Brown joined Bobby Byrd's vocal group, the Avons. Byrd turned the group's sound towards secular rhythm and blues and changed the group's name to The Flames. They toured the Southern “chitlin' circuit” and eventually signed a record deal. "Please, Please, Please" ended up becoming The Flames 1st R&B hit in 1956, selling 1M+ copies. When Little Richard left pop music in October 1957 to become a preacher, Brown filled out his remaining tour dates and several former members of Little Richard's backup band joined him. He hit #1 R&B in Feb. 1959 with "Try Me", best-selling R&B single of the year, 1st of 17 chart-topping R&B singles by Brown over the next 2 decades. By the time "Try Me" was released on record, the group's billing was changed to “James Brown and The Famous Flames.” He scored on the charts in the early 60s with his 1962 cover of "Night Train". While his early singles were major hits across the south and regular R&B Top Ten hits, he was not successful nationally until his self-financed live show was captured on the 1963 LP “Live at the Apollo”, on pop charts for 14 months, peaking at #2. Brown followed the success of “Live at the Apollo” with a string of singles that helped define Funk music. His 1964 hit "Out of Sight" reached #24 on pop charts and pointed the way to later Funk hits. Two of his signature tunes, "Papa's Got a Brand New Bag" (1966 Grammy for Best Rhythm & Blues Recording) and "I Got You (I Feel Good)", both from 1965, were 1st Top 10 pop hits as well as major #1 R&B hits, each remaining the top-selling singles in Black venues for over a month. His national profile was boosted that year by appearances in the movie “Ski Party” and concert film “The T.A.M.I. Show”, upstaging The Rolling Stones. In his concerts and records, Brown mingled his innovative rhythmic essays with Broadway show tunes and ballads, such as his hit "It's a Man's Man's Man's World" (1966). Changes in Brown's style that started with "Cold Sweat" (1967) also established the musical foundation for later hits such as "I Got the Feelin'" (1968) and "Mother Popcorn" (1969). His vocals, not quite sung but not quite spoken, became a major influence on techniques of rapping, which would mature with hip hop music in the coming decades. By 1970, The Famous Flames had disbanded, Bobby Byrd the only one remaining with Brown. His new backing band, dubbed "The J.B.'s", debuted on Brown's 1970 "Get Up (I Feel Like Being A) Sex Machine". In 1973, Brown provided the score for the blaxploitation film “Black Caesar”. In 1974, he toured Africa and performed in Zaire as part of the buildup to the Ali-Foreman “Rumble in the Jungle.” He had a resurgence in the 80s, crossing over to a more mainstream audience. He appeared in films “The Blues Brothers”, “Doctor Detroit” and “Rocky IV”, which featured his 1986 top 10 hit single "Living in America” (1987 Grammy for Best Male R&B Vocal Performance). His final US performance was in San Francisco on Aug. 20, 2006, his last TV appearance at his induction into the UK Music Hall of Fame in Nov. 2006. He danced vigorously as he sang, with dramatic leaps, splits and slides. His horn players and The Famous Flames typically performed choreographed dance routines. Male performers had to wear tuxedoes and cummerbunds. His own extravagant outfits and his elaborate processed hairdo completed the visual impression. A trademark feature of Brown's stage shows, usually during "Please, Please, Please", involved him dropping to his knees clutching the microphone stand in his hands, prompting the show's longtime MC, Danny Ray, to come out, drape a cape over Brown's shoulders and escort him off the stage. As Brown was escorted off the stage, The Famous Flames continued singing background vocals "Please, please don't go-oh-oh". Brown would shake off the cape and stagger back to the microphone for an encore. During the late 60s-early 70s, he was renowned for social activism. In 1966, he released the single "Don't Be a Drop-Out" as a lesson to young students with thoughts of dropping out. After the 1968 assassination of Martin Luther King, Jr., he released "Say It Loud – I'm Black and I'm Proud" which became an anthem of the civil rights movement. He performed in front of a televised audience in Boston the day after Dr. King's death and is credited with preventing rioting with his performance. Afterwards, President Johnson urged Brown to visit Washington to express that violence "wasn't the way to go". He continued performing benefit concerts for civil rights organizations throughout the early-70s. Brown also continued to release socially conscious singles such as "I Don't Want Nobody To Give Me Nothing (Open Up the Door, I'll Get It Myself)" (1969), "Get Up, Get Into It, Get Involved" (1971), "Talking Loud and Saying Nothing" (1972), "King Heroin" (1972), "Funky President (People It's Bad)" (1974) and "Reality" (1975). His personal life was marred by several brushes with the law, including serving 3 years in prison in South Carolina 1988-91 for carrying an unlicensed pistol and assaulting a police officer, along with various drug-related and driving offenses. After his death on Christmas Day, his relatives, friends, a host of celebrities and thousands of fans attended public memorial services at the Apollo Theater in New York on Dec. 28, 2006 and at the James Brown Arena on Dec. 30, 2006 in Augusta, Georgia. Autograph sentiment signed “To/Edward/from/ [signature]/thanks/for the/yrs” on a 5 x 3 white card. Received in person at New York City's Plaza Hotel on August 9 1993. With unsigned early b&w Universal Attractions publicity photograph of Brown singing.

Condition: Very good, some balky pen problems affect part of inscription
Type:Autograph Sentiment Signed






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