Eustis, James B. & Kellogg, William P.

Louisiana’s post-Reconstruction US Senators

Price: $35.00

Description:
JAMES B. EUSTIS (1834-1899) Louisiana US Senator (D) 1876-79, 1885-91, Ambassador to France 1893-97. Born in New Orleans, his father was a Chief Justice of the Louisiana Supreme Court. He graduated from Harvard Law School in 1854, admitted to the bar in 1856, and commenced practice in New Orleans. He served as judge advocate during the Civil War in the Confederate Army and resumed law practice law in New Orleans. Elected to the Louisiana legislature prior to the Reconstruction Acts, he was one of the committee sent to Washington to confer with President Johnson on Louisiana affairs. He was again a member of the state legislature in 1872, and a member of the state Senate 1874-78. Eustis was professor of civil law at the Tulane University Law School 1877-84, then called the University of Louisiana. His grandson was diplomat Charles Bohlen. WILLIAM P. KELLOGG (1830-1918) Vermont-born Reconstruction Governor of Louisiana 1873–1877, one of the most important Louisiana politicians during and right after Reconstruction. He was reelected after most other Republican officials were defeated when white Democrats regained control of state politics and was one of few Senators elected to the House upon leaving the Senate. He was the last Republican governor until David Treen in 1980. He moved to Peoria, Ill., at 18, became a lawyer, moved to Canton, and started a practice. There he joined the Republican Party and came to know Abraham Lincoln. When Lincoln became President in 1861, he appointed Kellogg Chief Justice of the Supreme Court of the Nebraska Territory. At the outbreak of the Civil War, he resigned, returned to Illinois and joined the 7th Illinois Cavalry. By 1862, he was a colonel and played an important role at a battle near Sikeston, Missouri. Later, he resigned because of ill health. In 1865, days before his assassination, Lincoln appointed him Collector of Customs of the port of New Orleans. He remained until 1868, when he was appointed to the US Senate, the year "reconstructed" Louisiana was readmitted to the Union. In 1872 he ran as a Republican and was elected governor, resigning from the Senate. In the 1872 election , Governor Henry Clay Warmoth, a Republican, opposed the Party faction loyal to President Grant, who supported Kellogg., and supported Democrat John McEnery. Election results were disputed by the Democrats and the state was in turmoil for months, both candidates holding inauguration celebrations, certifying their local candidate slates and trying to gather political power. Governor Warmoth controlled the State Returning Board that administered elections. Warmoth's board named McEnery the winner; a rival board claimed Kellogg the victor. Warmoth was impeached for allegedly stealing the election. Black Republican P. B. S. Pinchback became Governor for 35 days until Grant seated Kellogg as Governor with Federal protection. Kellogg's lieutenant governor was Caesar Carpetier Antoine, an African-American native of New Orleans. Despite the intense backlash against the Republican Party among white Democrats in the South, Kellogg was elected to the US Senate in 1876, serving until 1883. He did not seek reelection; his party was too weak in the South to be competitive. He was the chairman of the Senate Committee on Railroads 1881-83. He was elected to the House of Representatives in 1882 and served 1883-85. 4 ¾ x 7 autograph album page signed by Louisiana’s two US Senators, James B. Eustis (adds “La” under signature, and Willim P. Kellogg (adds “Louisiana” under signature), undated but ca. 1877-79.

Condition: Very good
Type:Signed Album Page






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