Specter, Arlen

The Senator-elect recommends an orchestra to the 1981 Presidential Inaugural Committee

Price: $10.00

Description:
(1930-2012) Pennsylvania Jewish moderate politician, Democrat 1951-65, Republican 1965-2009, then a Democrat until his death. US Senator 1981-2011, he was at the center of many of the Senate’s most divisive legal battles — from the Supreme Court nominations of Robert H. Bork and Clarence Thomas to the impeachment of President Bill Clinton. He enraged conservatives in 1987 by helping to derail Judge Bork’s nomination to the Supreme Court and then delighted them 4 years later by backing Justice Thomas. The Thomas confirmation nearly cost him his Senate seat; millions of American women remain furious with him for his aggressive questioning of Anita Hill, a law professor who had accused Justice Thomas of sexual harassment when they worked together at the Department of Education and the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission. He graduated from the University of Pennsylvania and served with the Air Force during the Korean War. He graduated from Yale Law School and served as assistant counsel for the Warren Commission investigating the assassination of John F. Kennedy. He helped devise the "single bullet theory,” which suggested the non-fatal wounds to Kennedy and wounds to Texas Governor John Connally were caused by the same bullet. This was a crucial assertion for the Warren Commission, since if the two had been wounded by separate bullets within such a short time frame, that would have demonstrated the presence of a 2nd assassin and therefore a conspiracy. Specter was District Attorney of Philadelphia 1965-73. In 1965, Specter ran for Philadelphia District Attorney against his former boss, incumbent James C. Crumlish, Jr. The city's Democratic leaders did not want Specter as their candidate, so he ran as a Republican and won election. He was defeated for a 3rd term in 1973. In 1976, Specter ran in the GOP primary for the US Senate and was defeated by John Heinz. In 1978, he was defeated in the primary for Governor by Dick Thornburgh. He ran again for the Senate in 1980 and won. In 1998 & 1999, Specter criticized the Republican Party for the impeachment of President Bill Clinton. Believing that Clinton had not received a fair trial, Specter voted "not proven" on Clinton's impeachment -his verdict was recorded as "not guilty" in the Senate records. He was chairman of the Senate Select Committee on Intelligence 1995-97, then became chairman of the Committee on Veterans Affairs. He chaired that committee until 2001 and again 2003-05. He also chaired the Judiciary Committee 2005-07. In 2010, he switched party affiliation and ran as a Democrat but lost the nomination to Joe Sestak, who lost to Republican Pat Toomey. Specter died from complications of non-Hodgkin's lymphoma, the longest serving of Pennsylvania's US Senators. TLS on 11 x 8 ˝ US Senate letterhead as Senator-Elect, Washington, December 18 1980, to a member of the Presidential Inaugural Committee. Specter recommends the Al Raymond Orchestra for possible inclusion in Inaugural Week musical activities, noting they played at the 1973 Presidential Inaugural Ball.

Condition: Very good
Type:Letter






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