Bronson, Charles

Signed portrait in western attire of the 1950s-70s action film hero

Price: $175.00

Description:
(B. Charles Buchinsky, 1921-2003) American film and television actor, starred in films such as “Once Upon a Time in the West”, “The Magnificent Seven”, “The Dirty Dozen”, “The Great Escape”, “Rider on the Rain”, “The Mechanic”, and the “Death Wish” series. He was often cast in the role of a police officer, gunfighter, or vigilante in revenge-oriented plot lines. Born in the coal region of the Allegheny Mountains north of Johnstown, Pennsylvania, he changed his last name to Bronson during the McCarthy era, fearing that Buchinsky sounded "too Russian". The name was taken from Bronson Avenue in Hollywood, where the famous gated entrance to Paramount Pictures is located. He served in the Army Air Force in WW II and received a Purple Heart for wounds received in battle. After the end of the war, he joined a theatrical group in Philadelphia, and later shared an apartment in New York City with Jack Klugman while both were aspiring to play on the stage. In 1950, he moved to Hollywood, where he enrolled in acting classes and began to find small roles. He made several appearances on television in the 1950s & 1960s, including “Alfred Hitchcock Presents”, “Hennesey”, The Twilight Zone (episode "Two", 1961). “Gunsmoke”, and appeared in 5 episodes of “ Have Gun-Will Travel” (1957–63). He scored the lead in his own ABC's detective series “Man with a Camera” (1958-60). In 1960, he garnered attention in John Sturges' “The Magnificent Seven”, in which he was cast as one of seven gunfighters taking up the cause of the defenseless. Two years later, Sturges cast him for another Hollywood production, “The Great Escape”, as a claustrophobic Polish POW. In 1961, he was nominated for an Emmy Award for his supporting role in an episode of CBS's General Electric Theater, hosted by Ronald Reagan. In the 1963–64 TV season he was in the ABC western series, “The Travels of Jaimie McPheeters”. In “The Dirty Dozen” (1967), he played an Army death row convict conscripted into a suicide mission. Bronson made a serious name for himself in European films. In 1968, he starred as Harmonica in “Once Upon a Time in the West”. Director Sergio Leone wanted to cast him for the lead in 1964's “A Fistful of Dollars” but Bronson turned him down and the role launched Clint Eastwood to stardom. In 1972 he began a string of successful action films for United Artists, beginning with “Chato's Land”. One of his most memorable roles came when he was over 50, in “Death Wish” (Paramount, 1974), the most popular film of his long association with director Michael Winner. He played a successful New York architect who, when his wife is murdered and his daughter sexually assaulted, becomes a crime-fighting vigilante by night. This successful movie spawned various sequels over the next 2 decades, in all of which Bronson appeared. He reached his pinnacle in box-office drawing power in 1975, when he was ranked 4th, behind only Robert Redford, Barbra Streisand, and Al Pacino. 10 x 8 SP, ¾ length seated b&w glossy photograph wearing western attire and holding pistol in his right hand. IMAGE NOTE: light flare at top is from office lighting, as are few timy "pink" spots on his shirt; none are on the actual item itself.

Condition: Very good, slight wrinkling at top edge
Type:Photograph






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Edward N. Bomsey Autographs, Inc.
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Annandale, VA 22003-2516
(703) 642-2040(phone & fax)




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