Jackson, Rev. Jesse L.

Signed color photo from his 1984 presidential campaign, 2nd African American to mount a national campaign

Price: $25.00

Description:
(b. 1941) African-American civil rights activist and Baptist minister, candidate for the 1984 & 1988 Democratic presidential nomination, “shadow” District of Columbia US Senator 1991-97. He is the founder of the organizations that became Rainbow/PUSH and was host of “Both Sides with Jesse Jackson” on CNN 1992-2000. While attending No. Carolina A&T, he became active in local civil rights protests against whites-only libraries, theaters and restaurants. He was ordained a minister in 1968. In 1965, he participated in the Selma to Montgomery marches organized by James Bevel, Dr. King and other civil rights leaders in Alabama. Impressed by Jackson's drive and organizational abilities, Dr. King soon gave Jackson a role in the Southern Christian Leadership Conference (SCLC), and when Jackson returned from Selma, he was charged with establishing a frontline office for the SCLC in Chicago. In 1966, King and Bevel selected Jackson to head the Chicago branch of the SCLC's economic arm, Operation Breadbasket and he was promoted to national director in 1967 On April 4, 1968, when Dr. King was shot, Jackson was in the parking lot one floor below. Jackson told reporters he was the last person to speak to King, and that King died in his arms – an account several King aides disputed. In the wake of King's death, Jackson worked on SCLC's Poor People's Crusade in Washington and was credited with managing its 15-acre tent city – but he began to increasingly clash with Ralph Abernathy, King's successor as chairman of the SCLC. In December 1971, Jackson and Abernathy had a complete falling out. Jackson, his entire Breadbasket staff and 30 of the 35 board members resigned from the SCLC and began planning a new organization. People United to Save (later changed to Serve) Humanity (Operation PUSH) began on Dec. 25, 1971. In 1984, Jackson organized the Rainbow Coalition and resigned as president of Operation PUSH to run for US president, though he remained involved as chairman of the board. PUSH's activities were described in 1987 as conducting boycotts of business to induce them to provide more jobs and business to blacks and as running programs for housing, social services and voter registration. In 1996, the Operation PUSH and Rainbow Coalition organizations were merged. In 1983, he traveled to Syria to secure the release of a captured American pilot held by the Syrian government. This helped Jackson's popularity and served as a springboard for his 1984 presidential run. In June 1984, Jackson negotiated the release of 22 Americans held in Cuba; on the eve of the 1991 Persian Gulf War, he went to Iraq to plead with Saddam Hussein for the release of foreign nationals held as the "human shield", securing the release of several British and 20 Americans. In1997 he met with Kenya’s president as President Clinton's special envoy for democracy to promote free and fair elections. In April 1999, Jackson went to Belgrade to negotiate the release of 3 Americans captured on the Macedonian border while patrolling with a UN peacekeeping unit. His international efforts continued into the 2000s. During the 1980s, he achieved wide fame as a politician and as a spokesman for civil rights issues. On Nov. 3, 1983, he announced his campaign for President in 1984, becoming the 2nd African American (after Shirley Chisholm) to mount a nationwide campaign for president. In the Democratic primaries, Jackson took 3rd place behind Senator Gary Hart and former Vice President Walter Mondale, who eventually won the nomination. He was criticized in the early 1980s for refusing to repudiate Louis Farrakhan and for remarks made to a reporter where he referred to New York City as "Hymietown" (Hymie a pejorative term for Jews.) Jackson ultimately apologized during a speech before national Jewish leaders in a Manchester, New Hampshire synagogue, but an enduring split between Jackson and many in the Jewish community continued at least through the 1990s. In 1988, Jackson again sought the Democratic presidential nomination and won 7 primaries and 4 caucuses. He became a key ally in gaining African American support for Bill Clinton and eventually became a close adviser and friend of the Clinton family. In 2003, Jackson declined to endorse the campaigns of the 2 African American candidates in the race for the Democratic 2004 presidential nomination. In March 2007, Jackson declared his support for then-Senator Barack Obama in the 2008 democratic primaries and attended the Obama victory rally in Chicago's Grant Park. 10 x 8 color ISP, glossy “Jesse Jackson for President, Inc.” bust portrait from his 1984 presidential campaign, gold printed facsimile signature at lower right, inscribed “To Brother ‘Jim’” and signed at top left.

Condition: Very good
Type:Photograph






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