Julian, George W.

1875 ALS of the staunch abolitionist, Indiana US Rep, 1852 Free Soil VP candidate, a leader of House Reconstruction-era radical Republicans

Price: $75.00

Description:
(1817-1899) Indiana politician, lawyer and writer, a leading opponent of slavery in politics before the Civil War. Free Soil Party's 1852 candidate for Vice President, noted radical Republican during the Civil War & Reconstruction. Indiana US Rep 1849-51, 1861-69, 1869-71. After election as a Whig to the Indiana legislature in 1845, Julian, raised a Quaker, started to question slavery. He helped found the Free Soil Party in 1848, was a delegate to the Buffalo convention, and the same year, was elected to Congress. In 1852, the Free-Soilers nominated him for Vice President with John P. Hale as their presidential candidate. They won no electoral votes, but received 155,210 popular votes. In 1854, he was among the first to enter the new Republican party in Indiana. He was a delegate to the Pittsburgh convention and to the 1856 Republican convention where he was its vice president and chairman of the Committee on Organization. In 1860, he was elected to Congress, and ranked among the most radical of House Republicans. An early supporter of slavery's abolition as a wartime measure, he was quick to call for enlisting and arming Blacks as US soldiers. Serving on the Joint Committee on the Conduct of the War, he investigated Confederate atrocities and mistreatment of prisoners of war, hectored generals who showed insufficient zeal in pressing the fight, and pushed hard for the removal of General McClellan, whose slowness in advancing on the enemy Julian saw as nearly treasonable. Julian was initially friendly to a radical Republican challenge to Lincolnís 1864 renomination and briefly joined the campaign to nominate Treasury Secretary Salmon P. Chase. He opposed Lincoln's Reconstruction plan, preferring the 1864 Wade-Davis Bill, and became a strong advocate of giving former slaves voting rights. Unlike many other radical Republicans, he wanted former Confederates punished. He called for hanging Jefferson Davis, Robert E. Lee and other former Confederate leaders and confiscation of their estates which would be parceled out among poorer people, White and Black, in the South, and among Union soldiers and sailors. He was one of the first to call for President Johnson's impeachment. As early as 1847, Julian espoused women's suffrage and in 1868 proposed to Congress a constitutional amendment conferring the right to vote on women. He was chairman of the Committee on Public Lands 1863 -71 and chairman of the Expenditures in the Navy Department 1865-67. Never a fan of Grant, who he insisted was a Democrat and a drunk, deeply disillusioned with corruption in the Grant Administration and the cynical, ruthless management of the Republican Party in Indiana, Julian joined the Liberal Republicans in 1872 and supported Horace Greeley for the presidency. In the election, Julian received 5 electoral votes for the vice-presidency. He supported the 1876 Democratic ticket. President Cleveland appointed him Surveyor General of New Mexico in May 1885, serving to Sept. 1889. Afterwards, he settled in Irvington, Indiana, and focused on literary pursuits, including his memoirs, published in 1884. His work on the Lands Committee in the House made him much in demand as a legal counsel in land cases, with very substantial fees. ALS on 8 x 5 light blue-lined paper, Irvington (Indiana), December 30 1875, to H. B. Myers, Esq., sending this letter to him, regrets he mislaid a slip Myers furnished.

Condition: Very good
Type:Letter






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