Kelvin, William Thomson, 1st Baron (ON HOLD)

Renowned British engineer and mathematical physicist, developed basis for “Absolute Zero” and formation of 1st & 2nd Laws of Thermodynamics

Price: $95.00

Description:
(1824-1907) British mathematical physicist and engineer, did important work in mathematical analysis of electricity and formation of the 1st & 2nd Laws of Thermodynamics at University of Glasgow, did much to unify emerging discipline of physics in its modern form. Propelled into public eye, wealth and honor thru career as an electric telegraph engineer and inventor. Knighted by Queen Victoria for work on the transatlantic telegraph, becoming Sir William Thomson. Noted for work on the mariner's compass and widely known for developing basis of Absolute Zero. Named Baron (Lord) Kelvin of Largs in honor of his achievements in thermodynamics, 1st UK scientist elevated to the House of Lords. Refused to leave Glasgow, remaining Professor of Natural Philosophy for 50+ years, published 600+ scientific papers and filed 70 patents (not all issued). Developed complete system for operating a submarine telegraph capable of sending a character every 3.5 seconds. He patented key elements of his system, the mirror galvanometer and the siphon recorder in 1858. In July 1865 Thomson sailed on the cable-laying expedition of the SS Great Eastern but the cable was lost after 1,200 miles had been laid and expedition had to be abandoned. An 1866 expedition managed to lay a new cable in 2 weeks and then recover and complete the 1865 cable. The enterprise was seen as a triumph by the public and Thomson, and the other principals of the project, were knighted in 1866. He also devised an automatic curb sender, a kind of telegraph key for sending messages on a cable. From 1855-67, he collaborated with Peter Guthrie Tait on the “Treatise on Natural Philosophy” which did much to define modern discipline of physics. Thomson introduced a method of deep-sea sounding and developed a tide predicting machine. During the 1880s, he worked to perfect an adjustable compass to correct errors arising from magnetic deviation owing to increasing use of iron in naval architecture. Thomson did more than any other electrician up to his time in introducing accurate methods and apparatus for measuring electricity, inventing current balance, or the Kelvin balance or Ampere balance (SiC), for precise specification of the ampere, standard unit of electric current. 4 x 5 sheet signed “Kelvin”, dated September 21 1897 by him below his in-person signature.

Condition: Very good
Type:Signed album page






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