Jacob, Francois

French-Jewish biologist, shared 1965 Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine for enzyme resarch

Price: $35.00

Description:
(1920-2013) French-Jewish biologist who, with Jacques Monod, originated the idea that control of enzyme levels in all cells occurs through regulation of transcription. He shared the 1965 Nobel Prize in Medicine with Monod and André Lwoff. During WW II, he went to Great Britain and having completed his 2nd year of medical studies, joined the medical company of the French 2nd Armored Division in 1940. He was injured in a German air attack in 1944 and returned to liberated Paris in August 1944. He was awarded France's highest WWII decoration for valor, the Cross of Liberation, as well as Légion d'Honneur and Croix de Guerre. After his recovery, Jacob returned to medical school and began researching tyrothricin and learning methods of bacteriology in the process. He became a medical doctor in 1947 and took a position at the Cabanel Center, where he had done his thesis research; working on the manufacture of antibiotic, tyrothricin. In 1961 Jacob and Jacques Monod explored the idea that the control of enzyme expression levels in cells is a result of regulation of transcription of DNA sequences. Their experiments and ideas gave impetus to the emerging field of molecular developmental biology, and of transcriptional regulation in particular. With the earlier determination of the structure and central importance of DNA, it became clear that all proteins were being produced in some way from its genetic code, and that this step might form a key control point. Jacob and Monod made key experimental and theoretical discoveries that demonstrated that in the case of the lactose system (in the bacterium E. coli), there are specific proteins devoted to repressing transcription of the DNA to its product (RNA, which in turn is decoded into protein). They extended this repressor model to all genes in all organisms in their initial exuberance. Along with the 1965 Nobel Prize, he received the 1962 Grand Prix Charles-Leopold Mayer by the Académie des Sciences, the 1996 Lewis Thomas Prize for Writing about Science, and in 1996 was admitted into the Académie Française Seat 38. SP, 5 x 3 ½ b&w glossy bust portrait photo with cigarette

Condition: Very good
Type:Photograph






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