Cox, Jacob D.

Mathew Brady Studio cabinet photo, likely while Grant's Interior Secretary

Price: $95.00

Description:
(1828-1900) Canadian-born Civil War Union general, 28th Ohio Governor (R), Grant's Secretary of the Interior 1869-70. In 1855 Cox helped organize the Republican Party in Ohio, was elected to the state Senate in 1860, and formed a political alliance with James Garfield and Salmon P. Chase. While in the legislature, he was commissioned Brigadier General with the Ohio Militia. At the start of the War, he led the Kanawha Brigade of the Dept. of the Ohio under McClellan and was attached to Pope's Army of Virginia in 1862. At the start of the Maryland Campaign, his brigade became the Kanawha Division of the IX Corps, Army of the Potomac. When Corps commander Maj. Gen. Jesse L. Reno was killed at the Battle of South Mountain, Cox assumed command of IX Corps. He was appointed Major General to rank from Oct. 6, 1862, but his appointment expired in March 1863; he was renominated and confirmed Dec. 7, 1864. During the 1864-65 Atlanta, Franklin-Nashville and Carolinas campaigns, Cox led the 3rd Division of the XXIII Corps, Army of the Ohio, under Major General Schofield. He is credited with saving the center of the Union line at the Nov. 1864 Battle of Franklin. Cox led the 3rd Division at the Battle of Wilmington in North Carolina then commanded the District of Beaufort and a Provisional Corps, which he led at the Battle of Wyse Fork, before it was officially designated XXIII Corps. Before mustering out Jan. 1, 1866, Cox was elected Ohio Governor, serving 1866-67, but his moderate views on African-American suffrage and his endorsement of President Johnson's Reconstruction policy led Ohio Republicans to reject his renomination. As President Grant's Interior Secretary March 1869-November 1870, he was an effective advocate of civil service reform and introduced a merit system for appointees. Secretary Cox resisted efforts of Republican spoilsmen to collect campaign assessments and dictate who would be appointed to various positions within the expanding Department of Interior. He advocated a lasting, honest, and comprehensive Indian policy legislated by Congress. He was unable to gain Grant's support over the fraudulent McGarrahan claims controversy. Although he was a reformer, Grant believed Cox overstepped his authority as Secretary and underminded his authority as President. After Grant failed to back him, he resigned. In 1876 Cox was elected Ohio US Rep but declined to be renominated. He supported President Hayes's reform efforts, but was unsuccessful at establishing permanent Civil Service reform. He was Dean of the Cincinnati Law School 1881-97 and President of the University of Cincinnati 1885-89. His books include: Atlanta (pub. 1882); The March to the Sea: Franklin and Nashville (1882); The Second Battle of Bull Run (1882); The Battle of Franklin, Tennessee (1897); and Military Reminiscences of the Civil War (1900). SP, 6 1/2 x 4 1/4 sepia cabinet bust photograph, Brady's National Portrait Gallery, Washington DC backstamp on verso, labeled "Brady" "Washington, D.C." on front bottom below image. Signed with sentiment by Cox upside down on verso. Undated but likely while Cox was in Grant's Cabinet. IMAGE NOTE: Portrait in web image is from a photocopy.

Condition: Very good
Type:Photograph






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