Lipton, Sir Thomas J.

1927 TLS to the wife of New York City's Police Commissioner by the celebrated yachtsman, founder of Lipton Tea Co.

Price: $110.00

Description:
(1848-1931) Scottish-born merchant and yachtsman, created the Lipton tea brand and was the most persistent challenger in the history of the America's Cup. In 1864 he signed up as a cabin boy on a Glasgow-Belfast steamer and was captivated by life aboard ship. He went to the US and spent 5 years working and traveling all over the country. He returned to Glasgow in 1870 and in 1871 opened his first provision shop, Lipton's Market, in Glasgow. He soon established a chain of groceries, first across Glasgow, the rest of Scotland, until finally throughout Britain. In 1888, when his empire had grown to 300 stores, he entered the tea trade and opened his tea-tasting office. He started bypassing traditional trading and wholesale distribution channels to sell teas at unprecedented prices to the untapped poor working class market. He bought plantations and in doing so established the Lipton Tea brand, still in existence today. In 1902 he was created a Baronet. King Edward VII and King George V both shared their interest in yachting with Lipton and enjoyed his company. He unsuccessfully challenged the US holders of the America's Cup thru the Royal Ulster Yacht Club 5 times between 1899 and 1930 with his yachts Shamrock thru Shamrock V. His well-publicized efforts to win the Cup earned him a specially designed cup for "the best of all losers", and made his tea brand famous in the US. A self-made man, Lipton was no natural member of the British upper class; the Royal Yacht Squadron admitted him only shortly before his death. He was inducted into the America's Cup Hall of Fame in 1993. Before the first Football World Cup was held in 1930, Lipton donated the Sir Thomas Lipton Trophy, contested in international tournaments in Turin in 1909 & 1911. He assisted medical voluntary organizations during WW I and put his yachts at the disposal of The Red Cross, the Scottish Women's Hospitals Committee and other groups for transport of doctors and nurses and medical supplies. He left the majority of his fortune to the City of Glasgow, including his yachting trophies, now on display at the Kelvingrove Art Gallery and Museum. TLS on 10 x 8 1/4 engraved "The Waldorf-Astoria/New York" letterhead, with vignette at top left, November 16 1927, to Mrs. R. E. Enright, Brooklyn. Lipton thanks her for her dinner invitation and would gladly accept except he is leaving for Canada and his return date is uncertain. Should he be back in time, he would be delighted to join her on the 26th. Lipton trusts he and the Commissioner are in the best of health and sends kind regards to them both. RICHARD E. ENRIGHT (1871-1953) New York City Police Commissioner 1918-25, 1st to rise from the rank-and-file to command the NYPD. He joined the NYPD in 1896, rose to lieutenant, and was highly popular as a champion for rank-and-file officers while president of the Police Lieutenants' Benevolent Assn. He instituted a number of reforms and improved working conditions for officers. He allowed a day off after every 6 days on duty, oversaw buildup of large police relief funds and improved the pension system. He reduced the number of precincts for better management, set up a special unit to handle vice and gambling on a city-wide basis, reorganized the arrest-quota based merit system and established the first NYPD police camp where ill or wounded officers could recover until able to return to duty. He successfully petitioned the US government to exempt police officers from the draft, established the Missing Persons Bureau as a 24-hour service, and increased the number of policewomen. The International Police Conference was developed by him to promote greater cooperation among world police forces. He also advocated universal fingerprinting registration for crime prevention and to resolve any identity question, as well as convicted criminals being required to pay damages to the victim and police with money earned in prison. During the early years of Prohibition, the NYPD came under fire for widespread corruption, ineffective enforcement of the Volstead Act, and rising violence from the "Bootleg Wars". In 1924, he tried to press charges against 13 inspectors, several deputy inspectors and police captains for failing to enforce the Act, but was not able to establish his cases. In frustration, he resigned Dec. 30, 1925, the day before his term expired, presumably to be eligible for a pension he later received. In 1933, Enright was employed by the US government to set up an enforcement division for the NRA. He was director of the United Service Detective Bureau until his death.

Condition: Very good, slight chipping at top left edge
Type:Letter






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