Johnson, Bradley T.

1871 ALS by the former Maryland Confederate general while a Richmond lawyer

Price: $125.00

Description:
(1829-1903) Maryland & Virginia lawyer, soldier, and writer. Although Maryland, his native state, remained loyal to the Union during the Civil War, he led efforts to raise a Maryland Line in the CSA, and became Brigadier General commanding the 1st Maryland Infantry, CSA. Graduate of Princeton 1849, read law and was admitted to the Maryland Bar in 1851. He was a delegate to the 1860 National Democratic Convention in Baltimore and joined the majority of his delegation in withdrawing from the convention and united with the Southern wing of the party supporting John C. Breckinridge. When the Civil War began, Johnson organized and equipped a company at his own expense and took an active part in forming the 1st Maryland Infantry, of which he became major then colonel, declining a lieutenant colonel's commission in a Virginia regiment because he felt his strongest obligation was to his own state. By early May 1861 some 500 Marylanders assembled at Harper's Ferry, Virginia, under his command, forming 8 companies of Maryland infantry. Johnson preferred not to join newly formed Virginia regiments, arguing that Marylanders should fight under their own flag. At the May 23, 1862 Battle of Front Royal, the 1st Maryland (CSA) battled the 1st Maryland Volunteer Infantry (USA), the only time in US military history that 2 regiments of the same numerical designation and from the same state engaged each other in battle. Two days later, on May 25, the 1st Maryland fought at the 1st Battle of Winchester, and at the Battle of Cross Keys on June 8, where the 1st Maryland successfully fought off 3 assaults by Federal troops. Johnson saw service in the Seven Days Battles in 1862, part of the Peninsula Campaign near Richmond, in which Lee drove the Army of the Potomac under McClellan away from Richmond and into retreat down the Virginia peninsula. Johnson was promoted to Brigadier General of cavalry in 1864. As commander of the post at Salisbury, No. Carolina, he used his influence to lessen suffering among prisoners of war and obtained their parole. After the war, he practiced law in Richmond until 1879, when he moved to Baltimore and where he is buried. ALS to James L. Smith Esq. of Alexandria, Virginia, on Johnson's 8 1/2 x 5 1/2 law firm letterhead, Richmond, June 5 1871, regarding meeting Smith on June 13th to try a law suit; handwriting a bit of a challenge.

Condition: Very good, folds
Type:Letter






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