Rostow, Walt W.

LBJ's Special Assistant for National Security Affairs, his main Vietnam War "hawk"

Price: $30.00

Description:
(1916-2003) US economist and political theorist, Special Assistant for National Security Affairs to LBJ 1966-69. He was prominent in the shaping of US foreign policy in Southeast Asia during the 60s and was a staunch anti-communist, noted for his belief in the efficacy of capitalism and free enterprise, and his strong support for US involvement in Vietnam. Rostow is known for his book "The Stages of Economic Growth: A Non-Communist Manifesto" (1960). NYC-born son of Russian-Jewish immigrants, his parents both active socialists, Rostow entered Yale at 15 on a full scholarship, graduated at 19, and completed his Ph.D. there in 1940. He won a Rhodes Scholarship to study at Oxford. After completing his education he taught economics at Columbia University. During WW II, he served in the OSS under General Donovan. After the war he became assistant chief of the German-Austrian Economic Division in the State Department and in 1947 became assistant to the Executive Secretary of the Economic Commission for Europe, involved in the development of the Marshall Plan. He was professor of economic history at MIT 1950-61 and a staff member of the Center for International Studies at MIT 1951-61. In 1954 he advised President Eisenhower on economic and foreign policy, and in 1958 became a speechwriter for him. In August 1954 Rostow helped convince Eisenhower to massively increase foreign aid for development as part of a policy of spreading US-style capitalist economic growth in Asia and elsewhere, backed by the military. In 1960 he published "The Stages of Economic Growth: A Non-Communist Manifesto", which proposed the Rostovian take-off model of economic growth, which argues that economic modernization occurs in 5 basic stages of varying length: traditional society, preconditions for take-off, take-off, drive to maturity, and high mass consumption. The book impressed presidential candidate John F. Kennedy who appointed Rostow as a political adviser. When JFK became president in 1961, he appointed him deputy to his national security assistant McGeorge Bundy. After Kennedy's assassination, Lyndon Johnson promoted him to Bundy's job after he wrote Johnson's 1st State of the Union speech. As national security adviser Rostow was responsible for developing government policy in Vietnam, and was convinced the war could be won, becoming Johnson's main war hawk and playing an important role in bringing Johnson's presidency to an end. Rostow left office at the end of LBJ's term and taught economics at the LBJ School of Public Affairs at the University of Texas at Austin for the next 30 years. He received the Presidential Medal of Freedom in 1969. ISP, 10 x 8 b&w bust portrait with very nice warm inscription to a Chicago children's center.

Condition: Very good
Type:Photograph






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