Platt, Thomas C.

1904 TLS by the New York GOP "boss", helped secure nomination of GovernorTheodore Roosevelt for VP in 1900 to get him out of New York State!

Price: $35.00 Special Offer - $30.00



Description:
(1833-1910) NY US Rep (187377) and Senator (1881, 1897-1909), late 19th-early 20th century New York State GOP "boss". He considered himself the "political godfather" of many Republican governors of the state, incl. Theodore Roosevelt. He also contributed to the creation of the City of Greater New York. Born in Oswego, he left Yale without a degree in 1852 then became a druggist for 2 decades. Platt became Secretary and a director of the United States Express Co. in 1879 and was elected company President in 1880. He was a member and President of the NY Board of Quarantine Commissioners 1880-88 and President of the Tennessee Coal & Iron Co. for several years. His first political appearance was in 1856 in the campaign of the GOP's 1st presidential candidate, John C. Fremont. He was elected Tioga County clerk as a Republican, serving 1859-61. He was elected to Congress, serving 1873-77. His influence on statewide politics began in 1877, when he aligned with the "Stalwart" faction led by Senator Roscoe Conkling at the Republican state convention, against the "Half Breed" faction loyal to President Hayes. He was elected US Senator with Stalwart support in Jan. 1881 and served March 4-May 16, 1881. He and Conkling resigned in a disagreement with President Garfield on federal appointments in New York. Garfield's assassination by self-proclaimed Stalwart Charles Guiteau, who claimed friendships with Platt and Conkling, was the finishing blow for their faction. Platt and Conkling ran in the special election to fill the vacancies created by their resignations and lost. Platt mended fences and rebuilt the machine, which he ran after 1887. He was elected to the Senate again in Jan. 1897 and served 1897-1909. He was Chairman of the Committee on Transportation Routes to the Seaboard in the 55th Congress and on the Committee on Cuban Relations and the Committee on Interoceanic Canals in the 59th Congress. To add to his power, Platt steered passage of the Greater New York bill in 1898 which incorporated the boroughs of Brooklyn, Queens and Staten Island into New York City as it is today. He supported Theodore Roosevelt's gubernatorial candidacy in 1898, but once elected, Roosevelt was independently minded, and crusaded against machines and corruption. Platt sought to "shelve" Roosevelt so that a more compliant governor could be installed. When Vice President Hobart died before the 1900 election, Platt and McKinley political ally Mark Hanna proposed to get TR out of Platt's way by nominating him for VP. Roosevelt played a major part in McKinley winning re-election and became President in Sept. 1901 after McKinley's assassination. Platt's control over the New York GOP ended in 1902. TR's successor as governor, Benj. B. Odell Jr., acted independently of Platt and took over as party leader. After Platt failed to block his renomination and Odell was re-elected, Platt was finished as "boss". TLS "T. C. Platt" on 11 x 8 1/2 United States Senate letterhead, 49 Broadway, New York City, October 13 1904, to Frank H. Curry, Staten Island. Platt expresses his great support for GOP gubernatorial candidate Frank W. Higgins to a Platt loyalist: "I feel a deep personal interest in the election of our State ticket. Mr. Higgins is and has been for years one of my warmest friends. The delegates who voted at Saratoga to make him our nominee were in the main my close political associates. The idea that the nomination of Mr. Higgins was an affront to me is ridiculous as it is unfortunate. My friends can show me no greater consideration, nor give any more pleasing manifestation of their friendship that by striving earnestly, aggressively and honestly for the election of our State ticket. I appeal to you individually to do me a personal kindness by exerting yourself to the achievement of this result which I have so greatly at heart." FRANK W. HIGGINS (1856-1907) New York politician, delegate to the 1888 Republican National Convention. He was a member of the New York State Senate 1894-1902, Lieutenant Governor 1903-04, and 35th NY Governor 1905-06, dying less than 2 months after leaving office.

Condition: Good, overall light wear, tears carefully repaired on verso, few creases, folds strengthened, small stain at left side
Type:Letter






[View Shopping Cart]
[Home] [Articles] [Biography] [Calendar]
[Catalogue] [Search]



enbainc@cs.com

Edward N. Bomsey Autographs, Inc.
7317 Farr Street
Annandale, VA 22003-2516
(703) 642-2040(phone & fax)




Home
Home

Articles
Articles

Biography
Biography

Calendar
Calendar

Catalogue
Catalogue

Search
Search