Liszt, Franz

Matted & framed signature of the legendary Hungarian composer and pianist

Price: $550.00
Additional Postage: $20.00 (for framed autograph)

Description:
(1811- 1886) Prolific 19th-century Hungarian composer, virtuoso pianist, conductor, music teacher, arranger, and philanthropist. He gained renown in Europe during the early 19th century for his prodigious skill as a pianist; in the 1840s he was considered the greatest pianist of all time. He was also a well-known and influential composer, piano teacher and conductor and a benefactor to other composers, including Wagner, Berlioz, Saint-Saens, Grieg and Borodin. As a composer, Liszt was one of the most prominent representatives of the New German School. He left behind an extensive and diverse body of work. Some of his most notable contributions were the invention of the symphonic poem, developing the concept of thematic transformation as part of his experiments in musical form, and making radical departures in harmony. He also played an important role in popularizing a wide array of music by transcribing it for piano. Liszt's father began teaching him piano at 7, and Franz began composing at 8 and appeared in concerts at 9. Wealthy sponsors financed his musical education abroad. In Vienna, Liszt received piano lessons from Carl Czerny and lessons in composition from Antonio Salieri, then music director of the Viennese court. His 1822 public debut in Vienna was a great success. He was greeted in Austrian and Hungarian aristocratic circles and also met Beethoven and Schubert. Towards the end of 1823-early 1824, Liszt's 1st composition was published, his "Variation on a Waltz by Diabelli" (now S. 147). After his father's death in 1827, Liszt moved to Paris where he came into contact with many of the leading authors and artists of his day, including Hugo, Lamartine, and Heine. The July 1830 Revolution inspired him to sketch a Revolutionary Symphony based on the events of the "three glorious days." He met Hector Berlioz the day before the premiere of his "Symphomie Fantastique." Berlioz's music made a strong impression on Liszt, especially later when he was writing for orchestra. After attending an April 20, 1832 charity concert given by violinist Niccolo Paganini, he became determined to be as great a virtuoso on the piano as Paganini was on the violin. In 1833 he made transcriptions of several works by Berlioz, including the Symphonie fantastique to help the poverty-stricken Berlioz, whose symphony remained unknown and unpublished. He also formed a friendship with Frederic Chopin; under his influence Liszt's poetic and romantic side began to develop. In 1833, Liszt began a relationship with the Countess Marie d'Agoult and his creative output exploded. In 1835 the countess left her family to join Liszt in Geneva. Liszt taught at the newly founded Geneva Conservatory, wrote a manual of piano technique and contributed essays for the Paris Revue et gazette musicale. For the next 4 years, Liszt and the countess lived together, mainly in Switzerland and Italy, where their daughter Cosima was born, with occasional visits to Paris. In spring 1844 the couple separated; this was Liszt's most brilliant period as a concert pianist. After 1842, "Lisztomania" swept across Europe. The reception that Liszt enjoyed as a result can be described only as hysterical. Women fought over his silk handkerchiefs and velvet gloves, which they ripped to shreds as souvenirs. This atmosphere was fuelled in great part by the artist's mesmeric personality and stage presence. Adding to his reputation was the fact that Liszt gave away much of his proceeds to charity and humanitarian causes. In 1841, Liszt received an honorary doctorate from the University of Konigsberg, an honor unprecedented at the time. In February 1847, Liszt played in Kiev where he met the Princess Carolyne zu Sayn-Wittgenstein who was to become one of the most significant people in the rest of his life. She persuaded him to concentrate on composition, which meant giving up his career as a travelling virtuoso. By retiring from the concert platform at 35, while still at the height of his powers, Liszt succeeded in keeping the legend of his playing untarnished. The next year, Liszt settled at Weimar where he had been appointed Kapellmeister Extraordinaire in 1842, remaining until 1861. During this period he acted as conductor at court concerts and at the theatre. He gave lessons to a number of pianists, including Hans von Bulow, who married Liszt's daughter Cosima in 1857 (years later, she married Richard Wagner). Liszt during the next 12 years revised or produced those orchestral and choral pieces upon which his reputation as a composer mainly rested. During this time he also helped raise the profile of the exiled Wagner by conducting overtures of his operas in concert, Liszt and Wagner had a profound friendship that lasted until Wagner's death in 1883. The 1860s were a period of great sadness in Liszt's life; he lost his son Daniel and his daughter Blandine. Liszt afterwards retreated to a monastery outside Rome, and on June 23, 1857, joined the Third Order of St. Francis. After his ordination he was often called Abbe Liszt. Liszt returned to Weimar in 1869 to give piano master classes, and in 1871 he did the same in Budapest at the Hungarian Music Academy. From then to the end of his life he regularly journeyed between Rome, Weimar and Budapest. He fell down the stairs of a hotel in Weimar on July 2, 1881 and never fully recovered. Several ailments manifested themselves and he became increasingly plagued by feelings of desolation, despair and preoccupation with death. He died in Bayreuth, Germany, on July 31, 1886, from pneumonia. Camille Saint-Saens, whom Liszt once called "the greatest organist in the world", dedicated his Symphony No. 3 "Organ Symphony" to Liszt; it premiered in London shortly before his death. Most concerts at this time were shared with other artists, and Liszt often accompanied singers, participated in chamber music, or performed works with an orchestra in addition to his own solo part. At some concerts, Liszt could not find musicians to share the program with, and consequently was among the first to give solo piano recitals. He also made piano arrangements of his own instrumental and vocal works, inc. the 2nd movement "Gretchen" of his "Faust Symphony" and the first "Mephisto Waltz" as well as the "Liebestraume No. 3" and the 2 volumes of his "Buch der Lieder". Liszt wrote transcriptions for piano of a wide variety of music. Indeed, about half of his composing work (approximately 400 out of 800 items) was arrangement of music by others. Approx. 1 1/2 x 3 (sight) "FLiszt" signature on white piece, no date, no place, matted with a 7 3/4 x 5 1/4 engraving of an older Liszt, in a 14 x 12 colorful frame.

Condition: Very good
Type:Framed signature






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