Hull, William

Surrendered Detroit to British in 1814 without a fight, his death sentence stayed by President Madison

Price: $275.00

Description:
(1753-1825) Lieut. Colonel in Revolutionary War, led Connecticut troops he raised and furnished at White Plains, Trenton, Princeton, Stillwater, Saratoga, Fort Stanwix, Monmouth, and Stony Point. He was recognized by George Washington and the Continental Congress for his service. Hull was a friend of Nathan Hale and tried to dissuade Hale from the dangerous spy mission that would cost him his life. He was largely responsible for publicizing Hale's famous last words: "I only regret that I have but one life to lose for my country." After the Revolution, he moved to his wife's family estate in Newton, Mass. and served as a judge and state senator. Appointed Governor of Michigan Territory by Jefferson 1805-12, he negotiated the Treaty of Detroit with the Ottawa, Chippewa, Wyandotte and Potawatomie nations, which ceded most of present-day SE Michigan to the United States. Brigadier General in War of 1812, led invasion of Canada from Detroit in July but was outmaneuvered and defeated by the British, and surrendered Detroit without a fight in August. Hull was, at least in part, the victim of poor preparation for war by the US government and miscommunication. While Governor, his repeated requests to build a naval fleet on Lake Erie to properly defend Detroit, Fort Mackinac, and Fort Dearborn were ignored by the commander of the Northeast, General Henry Dearborn. Hull began an invasion of Canada on July 12, 1812 but quickly withdrew to the US side of the river after hearing the news of the capture of Fort Mackinac by the British. He also faced unfriendly Native American forces, which threatened to attack from the other direction. A subordinate, Col. Lewis Cass, placed all blame for the surrender on Hull and subsequently succeeded Hull as Territorial Governor. Hull was court-martialed at a trial presided over by General Dearborn, was sentenced to be shot for cowardice and neglect of duty. The sentence was stayed by Madison because of Hullís Revolutionary War service. The 1824 publication of his memoirs changed public opinion somewhat in his favor, and he was honored with a dinner in Boston on May 30, 1825. That June, Lafayette visited Hull and declared, "We both have suffered contumely and reproach; but our characters are vindicated; let us forgive our enemies and die in Christian love and peace with all mankind." He was the uncle and adoptive father of naval hero Issac Hull. 12 1/2 x 7 3/4 ADS, Newton, Massachusetts, November 28 1801, 2pp (back-to-back) deed and mortgage with integral address leaf with docket on 4th page, completed and signed by him 3 times in the body at the conclusion. Hull sells Ward a 60 acre tract in Newton with a dwelling. Witnessed by Sarah Hull (his wife) and daughter Maria and by Silas Hathaway. Docketed by Justice of the Peace William Hunt, Registrar Samuel Bartlett, and with an 1805 ADS of Ward receipting contents of some notes.

Condition: Very good, folds few minor edge starts
Type:Document






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