Longworth, Nicholas

1927 TLS as House Speaker, declines invitation to speak at Tufts' convocation

Price: $75.00

Description:
(1869-1931) Ohio US Rep 1903-13, 1915-31, House Speaker 1925-31; husband of Theodore Roosevelt's daughter Alice, married in the White House in 1906. A House office building was named for him in 1962. He first came to political prominence in 1910, when he led the successful Republican revolt against the autocratic rule of House Speaker Joseph G. Cannon. As insurgent "Progressive" Republicans pulled apart from the conservatives in 1910–12, Longworth sided with the conservatives. Theodore Roosevelt led the Progressives, and bolted the Republican convention in the 1912 election to set up a third party. However, Longworth supported conservative standard-bearer President William H. Taft. Longworth's decision caused a permanent chill in his marriage to Alice. Because the Progressive Party ran a candidate in his district, Longworth was defeated (by only 105 votes) in 1912. Alice appeared at a speech by his Progressive opponent and thereafter joked that her appearance cost him at least 100 of those votes. Ironically, his first act as Speaker was to restore much of the power to the office that was stripped away during the revolt against Joseph Cannon that he helped lead. He began his tenure by punishing 13 self-styled Progressives, who supported Robert M. La Follette, Sr. instead of Calvin Coolidge in 1924. He expelled them from the GOP caucus, and stripped even the committee chairmen among them of all seniority. Longworth took control of the Steering Committee and Committee on Committees and placed his own men on the Rules Committee, guaranteeing that he controlled the work of the House. Ignoring the left wing of the party, Longworth passed legislation that aimed for balanced budgets and major tax reductions, resisting any new programs that would expand the role of government. However, Longworth defied President Hoover in 1931 by supporting the long-stalled Veterans Bonus bill; it passed but Hoover vetoed it, setting up the Bonus March of 1932. Longworth reached across the aisle to Democrats, forging a close rapport and productive relationship with John Nance Garner, then House Minority Leader. Together they hosted a daily gathering of Democratic and Republican congressmen in a secluded room in the Capitol, which became known as the "Bureau of Education." This unofficial club provided a place for politicians to relax with a drink and get to know and work with one another across party lines. TLS on 10 1/2 x 8 blue engraved "The Speaker's Rooms/House of Representatives U.S./ Washington, D.C." letterhead, March 2 1927, to Alfred G. [sic] Lane, Cambridge, Mass. Speaker Longworth thanks Lane for his invitation to address a convocation of students at Tuft's (sic) when he is in Boston on March 16. Longworth has heard from Mr. Dallinger (Frederick W. Dallinger, 1871-1955, GOP Mass. US Rep 1915-25 & 1926-32) and wishes he could do it "...both on his account and for the pleasure it would give me to visit Tuft's [sic] College and meet the faculty and student body." As his time in Boston during his visit is "thoroughly engaged", however, he must decline the invitation with deep regret. ALFRED CHURCH LANE (1863–1948) Michigan State Geologist 1899-1909. The 1st thorough topographic survey of Michigan began under his direction. He resigned to become Pearson Professor of Geology and Mineralogy at Tufts College (now, Tufts University). He is called the “Forgotten Man” of atomic research for his role in early work on splitting the atom. In 1940, he received Tufts's Ballou Medal for distinguished service to education and the nation. Working with German scientist Otto Hahn, Lane helped inaugurate an international plan for the exchange of scientific information on smashing the atom in 1926. He was the 1st American to receive notice from Hahn about his successful splitting of a uranium atom in 1938, and immediately passed the information on to Washington. In 1929, Lane became the 1st consultant in science ever appointed at the Library of Congress. In his lifetime, he published 1,087 articles and reports in scientific and general journals. TUFTS COLLEGE was founded in 1852, the name changed to Tufts University in 1954, although the corporate name remains "the Trustees of Tufts College."

Condition: Very good, 2 mail folds
Type:Letter






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