Taft, William H.

1921 ALS thanking an Illinois congressman for his congratuations on Taft's appointment, confirmation and swearing-in 3 days earlier as Chief Justice

Price: $650.00

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(1857-1930) 27th President of the US 190913, 10th Chief Justice of the United States 19211930, only person to have served in both of these offices. Before becoming President, Taft, a Republican, served on the Superior Court of Cincinnati in 1887. In 1890, he was appointed US Solicitor General and in 1891, as a judge on the US Court of Appeals for the 6th Circuit. In 1900, President McKinley appointed him Governor-General of the Philippines. In 1904, Theodore Roosevelt appointed him Secretary of War to groom Taft, his close political ally, as his presidential successor. Taft won an easy victory in his 1908 bid for the presidency. His domestic agenda emphasized trust-busting, civil service reform, strengthening the Interstate Commerce Commission, improving postal service performance, and passage of the 16th Amendment. He sought to further economic development in Latin America and Asia through "Dollar Diplomacy", and showed decisiveness and restraint in response to revolution in Mexico. Oblivious to political ramifications of his decisions, he often alienated his own key constituencies, and was overwhelmingly defeated for re-election in 1912. After leaving office, Taft spent his time in academia, arbitration, and the search for world peace through his self-founded League to Enforce Peace. President Harding nominated Taft on June 30, 1921 and the Senate confirmed him the same day, 614, without any committee hearings and after a brief debate in executive session. Taft drew objections from 3 Progressive Republicans and a southern Democrat. Taft served until shortly before his death in 1930. ALS as brand-new Chief Justice of the United States on 10 1/2 x 8 "The New Willard, Washington" engraved letterhead, July 14 1921, to Mr. (Rep.) Rodenberg. Taft thanks him for his "kind words of congratulations", it is "going to be hard work but I hope I can do it." He closes by saying: "The general approval of which you speak is very gratifying." The Willard Hotel is a historic Washington luxury Beaux-Arts hotel at 1401 Pennsylvania Avenue NW, almost next door to The White House. It was formally founded in 1847, the present building opened in 1901. It suffered a major fire in 1922; among those evacuated were Vice President Coolidge, several US Senators, composer John Philip Sousa, film producer Adolph Zukor, newspaper publisher Harry Chandler and other media, corporate, and political leaders present for the annual Gridiron Dinner. For many years the Willard was the only hotel from which one could easily visit all of downtown Washington, and consequently housed many dignitaries during its history. The first group of Japanese ambassadors to the US stayed at the Willard in 1860; from Feb. 4-27, 1861, the Peace Congress, with delegates from 21 of the 34 states, met there in a last-ditch attempt to avert civil war and, later that year, Julia Ward Howe wrote the lyrics to "The Battle Hymn of the Republic" while staying at the hotel in November 1861. On Feb. 23, 1861, detective Allan Pinkerton smuggled Abraham Lincoln into the Willard during the weeks before his inauguration; Lincoln lived there until his inauguration on March 4, holding meetings in the lobby and carrying on business from his room. Every president since Franklin Pierce has either slept in or attended an event at the hotel at least once; the hotel hence is also known as "the residence of presidents." It was U. S. Grant's habit to drink whiskey and smoke a cigar while relaxing in the lobby. Plans for Wilson's League of Nations took shape when he held meetings of the League to Enforce Peace in the lobby in 1916. Six sitting Vice-Presidents have lived in the Willard. Martin Luther King Jr. wrote his famous "I Have a Dream" speech in Willard room in 1963 in the days before the March on Washington. The Willard family sold its share of the hotel in 1946, and due to mismanagement and severe decline of the area, the hotel closed in 1968. It sat vacant for years, fell into a semi-public receivership and was eventually rehabilitated and sold to the Intercontinental Hotels Group to operate the hotel. The Willard was restored to its turn-of-the-century elegance and an office-building contingent was added. The hotel re-opened on August 20, 1986; in the late 1990s, the hotel once again underwent significant restoration. WILLIAM A. RODENBERG (1865-1937) Ill. US Rep (R) 1899-1901, 1903-13, 1915-23. He was a delegate to the 1896, 1908, 1916, & 1920 GOP Conventions. He was appointed to the Civil Service Commission by President McKinley, serving 1901-02, then resumed law practice in East St. Louis. He was chairman of the Committee on Industrial Arts and Expositions (61st Congress). On Apr 5, 1917, he voted with 49 other Congressmen against declaring war on Germany. He was chairman of the Committee on Flood Control in the 66th & 67th Congresses. In Nov. 1915, Rodenberg traveled on the train car along with the Liberty Bell as it passed through so. Illinois on its national tour returning to Philadelphia from the Panama-Pacific International Exposition in San Francisco. He later practiced law in Washington.

Condition: Very good, mail folds
Type:Letter






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