Granville, 2nd Earl (Granville George Leveson-Gower)

1849 ALS of the future Liberal Party 3-time Foreign Secretary

Price: $20.00

Description:
Granville George Leveson-Gower, 2nd Earl Granville, Lord Leveson to 1846 (1815-1891). British Liberal statesman for 50+ years, Foreign Secretary 3 times, led the Liberal Party in the House of Lords for 30 years, joint Leader of the Liberal Party 1875-80. Lord Granville was engaged in 1864 to envoy and CSA spy Rose O'Neal Greenhow; shortly after their engagement, she drowned when her rowboat overturned while escaping a US blockade ship. He is best known for his pacific stewardship of Britain's external relations 187074 & 188085 with his best friend, PM Gladstone. His foreign policy kept Britain free from European wars and improved US relations after the strain of the Civil War. In 1836 he was Under-Secretary of State for Foreign Affairs in Melbourne's ministry. He was an MP 1841 till his father's death in 1846, when he succeeded to the title. In the House of Lords he distinguished himself as a Free Trader. In 1851 he succeeded Palmerston as Foreign Secretary; in 1852 he became Lord President of the Council in Lord Aberdeen's government, Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster in 1854. Under Palmerston (1855) he was again president of the Council. In 1856 he became Chancellor of the University of London, a post he held for 35 years, championing admission of women and teaching of modern languages. From 1855 he led the Liberals in the Upper House, in office and in opposition. In June 1859, Queen Victoria sent for him to form a ministry, but he was unable to do so; Palmerston again became PM, Russell foreign secretary, and Granville President of the Council. He owned coal and ironstone mines at Stoke-on-Trent and was principal shareholder of the Shelton Iron & Steel Co., which in 1873 operated 8 blast furnaces and 97 puddling furnaces. During the US Civil War, he was non-interventionist with most of Palmerston's cabinet. His Sept. 1862 memorandum against intervention proved a strong reason why Palmerston did not intervene and why British relations with the North remained fairly stable during the rest of the war. In Dec. 1868 he became Colonial Secretary in Gladstone's 1st ministry, and was invaluable in carrying the Irish Church and Land Bills thru the House of Lords. On 27 June 1870, he became Foreign Secretary (187074, 188085). His Gladstonian foreign policy kept Britain free from European wars, brought better relations with the US, settled British-American fisheries and Civil War disputes over Confederate cruisers built in Britain, like the Alabama, through international arbitration in 1872. In Egypt, Afghanistan, Equatorial and SW Africa, British foreign policy was dominated by suavity rather than by strength which commanded respect there. When Gladstone took up Irish Home Rule in 1886, Granville gave way to Lord Roseberry at the foreign office; in July 1886 he retired from public life. Granville Street is a major thoroughfare in Vancouver, BC; it is also the name of a Sydney suburb. Granville Road, Granville Square and Granville Circuit in Hong Kong are named after him. ALS "Granville", 2pp (1 7 x 4 1/2 sheet, both sides), London, May 2 1849, to an unknown correspondent, regarding a position with one of his mining interests.

Condition: Good, some staining at right, toning and staining on 1st page
Type:Letter






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