Hindley, Charles

1837 ALS to fellow reformer and a Chartist Movement founder,William Lovett, hopes to attend London Working Men's Association dinner

Price: $50.00

Description:
(1796-1857) English cotton mill-owner and Radical politician, MP 1835-57. He was active in the Factory Reform movement, in the opposition to the New Poor Law and to state involvement in religious and educational matters. About 1816, he became manager of his eldest brother's small cotton mill in Dukinfield. He called himself a radical since "radicalism was the best security for liberty and for every institution worth preserving". His support for radicalism reflected the views of his constituency. He supported Parliamentary Reform, disestablishment of the Church of England, and Free Trade. He was prominent in the Peace Society and in the International Peace Congress movement. He was an early supporter of the factory reform movement, and opposed the New Poor Law. In June 1837, he was one of a handful of MPs present in the British Coffee House, London, at a meeting of the Working Men's Association which passed resolutions supporting Universal Suffrage, equal representation, free election of representatives without reference to property, the ballot, and short Parliaments of fixed duration, not over 3 years, in effect the birth of the Chartist Movement. However, he was far from being a Chartist, believing radicals should always ally with Whigs and be prepared to accept compromises falling short of their aims. Although a mill-owner, he supported factory reform, arguing Parliament should legislate hours cotton mills could run rather than hours individuals could work. The limit on hours worked was to him less important than that the limit was generally agreed and easily enforced. After defeat of the Ten-Hour Bill of 1846, he privately urged an Eleven-Hour Bill in the next session of Parliament. His advice was rejected and a Ten-Hour Bill was passed in 1847. When the Act of 1847 was in danger of circumvention, he supported the Compromise Act of 1850, which increased working hours slightly in return for an agreed enforceable regulation of hours worked. Hindley was a "voluntarist", holding that the state should have nothing to do with religious matters and urged disestablishment of the Church of England and removal of all its privileges, but also objected to state support of non-conformists and Catholics. He objected to the organization of the Church, not its doctrines. On education, he first held that the state should not be involved and was prominently opposed to the Factory Education Bill of 1843. He was a director of the Protestant Dissenters' Life and Fire Assurance Society, The People's Provident Assurance Society, the Manchester, Sheffield and Lincolnshire Railway, and the Union Bank of Australia. He was a founding shareholder and a director of the South Australian Company by Oct. 1835. Hindley Street in Adelaide is named for him. 10 x 8 ALS while MP, Dukinfield, November 4 1837, to William Lovett, Secretary to the Working Men's Association, London. Hindley apologizes for the delay in his response and allows that should his health permit, he will be most pleased to attend the dinner on the 22nd, is grateful for the Association's invitation. With free franked and address leaf in his hand with postmark and remnant of black wax seal. WILLIAM LOVETT (1800-1877) British activist best known for his role in the Chartist movement, an 1838-50 campaign for parliamentary reforms to correct inequities remaining after the 1832 Reform Act. A self-educated member of the Cabinetmakers Society and later its President, he rose to national political prominence as founder of the Anti-Militia Association ("no vote, no musket") and was active in wider trade unionism through the Metropolitan Trades Union and Owenite socialism. In 1831, during Reform Act agitation, he helped form the National Union of the working Classes. After the passage of the Reform Act he campaigned to repeal taxes on newspapers. In June 1836 Lovett founded the London Working Men's Association with several radical colleagues. In 1838 Lovett and fellow Radical Francis Place drafted a parliamentary bill, the foundation of the People's Charter. In February 1839 the first Chartist Convention met in London, and unanimously elected Lovett its Secretary. A proponent of the idea that political rights could be garnered through political pressure and non-violent agitation, Lovett retired from overt political activity after a year in prison on the political charge of seditious libel 183940. While in prison he co-wrote "Chartism, a New Organisation of the People", which focused on Chartist Education. In 1841 he formed the National Association for Promoting the Political and Social Improvement of the People, to implement his New Move educational initiative through which he hoped poor workers and their children would be able to better themselves. The New Move did not generate popular support; membership never surpassed 5000, and education was limited to Sunday schools. He later devoted himself to the National Association for Promoting the Political and Social Improvement of the People, seeking to improve lives of poor workers and their children by means of a Chartist educational program. He believed in temperance and in teaching methods founded on kindness and compassion. Lovett wrote his autobiography in 1877 and died impoverished that year.

Condition: Very good, scattered mount remnants at edge of address lead
Type:Letter






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