Kefauver, Estes

Tennessee US Senator, led 1950-51 Senate organized crime investigation, 1956 Democratic VP candidate

Price: $75.00

Description:
(1903-1963) Tennessee US Rep (D) 1939-49, Senator 1949-63. In his 5 terms in the House, he was a staunch supporter of FDR's New Deal, especially the TVA, and concentrated much of his legislative efforts on congressional reform and anti-monopoly measures. When he sought nomination to the Senate in 1948, the coonskin hat becoming his trademark. Once in the Senate, he was a crusader for consumer protection, antitrust legislation, support for organized labor, and, to an extent, civil rights. Between 1957-63, his Senate Antitrust and Monopoly Subcommittee investigated concentration in the economy, industry by industry, and issued a report exposing monopoly prices in the steel, automotive, bread and pharmaceutical industries. He was one of 3 southern Senators to not sign the 1956 "Southern Manifesto". In 1950, Kefauver headed "the Kefauver Committee", investigating organized crime, which held hearings in 14 cities and heard testimony from over 600 witnesses, including crime bosses like Joe Adonis and Frank Costello. Committee hearings were televised live which made Kefauver nationally famous and introduced many Americans to the Mafia. In 1952, he ran for the Democratic presidential nomination, campaigning in his coonskin cap. After he soundly defeated President Truman in the New Hampshire primary, Truman withdrew his bid for reelection. Kefauver won 12 of 15 primaries and entered the convention a few hundred votes short of a delegate majority. He lost the nomination to Adlai Stevenson, choice of Democratic Party bosses, and would again lose the 1956 nomination to Stevenson. Stevenson let the delegates pick his VP nominee, and Kefauver won the nomination. Stevenson lost the election to Eisenhower by an even bigger margin than in 1952. Kefauver was considered the front-runner for the 1960 nomination, but in 1959, he announced he was not going to seek the nomination. In 1962, he introduced a bill that would eventually become the Kefauver-Harris Drug Control Act, which required drug companies to disclose to doctors side-effects of their products, allow their products to be sold as generic drugs after having held the patents for a certain period of time, and be able to prove their products were, in fact, effective and safe. The federal courthouse in Nashville was renamed in his honor after his death. TLS on his 8 x 5 1/4 US Senate letterhead, Washington, sending condolences to Mrs. Wm. W. Howes, Washington. Senator Kefauver is sorry to learn of her husband's passing and wishes he could say something to help lessen her sorrow. He cryptically adds: "Our association in the critical period of adjustment, in which he played a major role, showed his integrity and loyalty. As our mutual friend the late Silliman Evans, Sr. once said 'Bill has what it takes'." With printed free franked Senate envelope. SILLIMAN EVANS SR. (?-1955) president of the Nashville "Tennessean" newspaper 1937-55. WILLIAM W. HOWES (1887-1962) As Second & First Assistant Postmaster General 1933-40 (FDR), he brought airmail service to the Midwest. He was So. Dakota state senator, chairman of the So. Dakota Democratic Party, and a member of the Democratic National committee.

Condition: Very good, mail folds
Type:Letter






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