Kelly-Kenny, Sir Thomas (ON HOLD)

British Lieutenant General in 2nd Boer War, led 6th Division, South African Field Force

Price: $40.00 Special Offer - $35.00



Description:
(1840-1914) Irish-born British Army general in the 2nd Boer War, educated at St. Patrick's College, Carlow. He joined the Army in 1858 and at the outbreak of war with China in 1860 he went with regiment to the Far East where he was named ADC to the Commander of the Queen's, Sir Alfred Jephson, a rank he held for the duration of the war. He was appointed Lieutenant by purchase in 1860 and engaged in the China war at Sinho and the taking of Tanku and Taku forts for which he was decorated. He was appointed Captain by purchase on in 1866, serving in Bombay 1869-70 when he was sent to Abyssinia on the outbreak of war. In 1875, he graduated at the staff training college. Kelly-Kenny took a keen interest in County Clare affairs and in 1876 Captain Thomas Kelly Kenny held 5736 acres in Clare. He was promoted Lieutenant-Colonel in 1881. In the 2nd Boer war of 1899¨C1902 he was a Lieutenant-General, commanding the 6th Division, South African field force and received the Queen¡¯s South African Medal with 4 clasps. He was involved in the relief of Kimberley and battles of Paardeberg, Poplar Grove, and Driefontein. At Paardeberg his conservative plan was to besiege Cronje and bombard his force from a safe distance with superior artillery. When Roberts became ill, he appointed Lieutenant-General Kitchener as commander. He overruled Kelly-Kenny and ordered an assault on Boer trenches. The result was "Bloody Sunday", an unnecessary sacrifice of hundreds of British lives. At Poplar Grove and Driefontein, the 6th division distinguished itself by its fight after a 6-hour march under a scorching sun, seen as key in destroying Boer morale and winning the war. He was a close friend of King Edward VII who treated him as confidential military advisor. In Oct. 1901 he was appointed Adjutant General of the Forces which he held until 1904 at the insistence of the King, who liked him for his industry and administrative capacity. Commander-in-Chief Lord Roberts did not share this opinion. The General was conservative about reform, and the War Office opposed his appointment. He did not work well with colleagues who tried to reduce his powers, which the King opposed. They tried to return him to command in 1902 offering the 4th Army Corps, which he declined, pleasing the King. He was named a Knight Commander of the Order of the Bath in the 1902 Coronation Honors list and received the knighthood in a private audience during the King¡äs convalescence on board HMY Victoria and Albert. The War Office bowed to royal wishes and left him in his post until the 1904 reforms. Kelly-Kenny accepted appointment as Colonel, The Queen's (Royal West Surrey Regiment) 1902 to his death. He was quite a celebrity appearing on cigarette cards commemorating his Boer war successes and marches. He was a regular at court, on friendly terms with Queen Alexandra. He retired 1907. Signed 2 1/4 x 4 piece as Lieutenant General, 6th Division. With 15 1/2 x 10 color 8/29/01 Vanity Fair "Spy" print, captioned "6th Division". Because of size, $10 extra shipping charge applies if print is desired.

Condition: Very good, slight bend at very lower left cornerVery good, slight horizontal bend thru "6th Division"
Type:Signature






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